Articles

Articles from Poet & Writers Magazine include material from the print edition plus exclusive online-only material.

All's Fair in Poems About Love and War

by Kevin Larimer

News and Trends

Posted 1.1.05

January/February 2005

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Despite the fluctuating aesthetics and ideologies espoused by critics, professors, and practitioners of poetry, there remain two general subjects that consistently offer poets inspiration: love and war; but with walentine’s Day just around the corner, three new anthologies of love poems are offering readers a respite from verse about violence.

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Google Ogles Print

by Kevin Canfield

News and Trends

Posted 1.1.05

January/February 2005

The widely used online search engine Google recently launched a new feature that allows Web users to search within pages of published books. 

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Kirkus Reviewed

by Kevin Canfield

News and Trends

Posted 1.1.05

January/February 2005

The biweekly magazine Kirkus Reviews publishes pre-publication book reviews, offering professional opinions of approximately 5,000 titles per year. But the tables have turned on the 72-year-old publication as writers and publishers offer their own appraisals of its recent decision to charge money for some book reviews. 

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The Confessions of a Sestinas Editor

by Daniel Nester

News and Trends

Posted 1.1.05

January/February 2005

How did I become a sestinas editor? It all began with a rejection letter. “Thanks for sending,” it read, “but we’re looking for more traditional, iambic pentameter sestinas."

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An Interview With Editor Lewis Turco

by Daniel Nester

Direct Quote

Online Only, posted 12.15.04

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In the world of hip-hop, Lewis Turco would be considered an “Original Gangsta,” an “O.G.”—a title given to someone who started it all. In the more genteel business of poetry writing, however, Turco would be called an “Institution,” and what he started was nothing less than a renewed appreciation of poetic forms. Since its first edition in 1968, his reference book The Book of Forms has become a standard text for poets of all stripes. A cross between The Joy of Cooking and According to Hoyle for poets, Turco’s text remains a rarity: a reference book with personality. Turco’s lucid, empathetic entries on every form under the sun continue to serve many poets writing their first pantoums or settling drunken bets on the rhyme scheme of the rimas dissolutas (abcdef abcdef ghijlk ghijlk ..., if written in sestets).

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An Interview With Fiction Writer JT Leroy

by Litsa Dremousis

Direct Quote

Online Only, posted 12.15.04

Eleven years ago, JT LeRoy was a teenager living on the streets of the San Francisco Bay Area, turning tricks and suffering from dissociative episodes. Today, he is a critically acclaimed author whose first two books, the novel Sarah (Bloomsbury, 2000) and the collection of short stories The Heart Is Deceitful Above All Things (Bloomsbury, 2001), have been translated into more than a dozen languages—most recently, Turkish. His novella, Harold’s End, illustrated by renowned painter Cherry Hood, with an introduction by Dave Eggers, was recently published by Last Gasp, an independent press in San Francisco.

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Return From Silence: An Interview With Norman Dubie

by Mary Gannon

Feature

Posted 11.1.04

November/December 2004

After a 10-year hiatus from publishing, Norman Dubie has returned with an award-winning volume of collected and new poetry, a 400-page sci-fi poem, and his latest, Ordinary Mornings of a Coliseum.

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Grassroots Effort Saves Poetry Reviews

by Kevin Larimer

News and Trends

Posted 11.1.04

November/December 2004

The industry trade magazine Publishers Weekly this summer decided to stop publishing its monthly Poetry Forecast section, an editorial move that would have had deleterious effects on independent publishers. In response to complaints from many publishers, editors, and poets, the decision was reversed a few weeks later, before any changes were made to the magazine.

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A Contest Clinker

by Kevin Larimer

News and Trends

Posted 11.1.04

November/December 2004

When New Rivers Press announced that Ron Rindo of Oshkosh, Wisconsin, was a winner of the 2003 MVP Competition this past summer, some of the approximately six hundred entrants were perplexed. The guidelines stated that the contest, which awards three $1,000 prizes and the publication of three book-length manuscripts, was open to emerging poets, fiction writers, and creative nonfiction writers. Rindo, who won for his short story collection Love in an Expanding Universe, had previously published two books, both with New Rivers Press.

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Page One: Where New and Noteworthy Books Begin

by Staff

News and Trends

Posted 11.1.04

November/December 2004

Page One features a sample of titles we think you'll want to explore. With this installment, we offer an excerpt from Torture the Artist by Joey Goebel.

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