Articles

Articles from Poet & Writers Magazine include material from the print edition plus exclusive online-only material.

Page One: Where New and Noteworthy Books Begin

by Staff

News and Trends

Posted 11.1.03

November/December 2003

Page One features a sample of titles we think you'll want to explore. With this installment, we offer excerpts from Jesus Sound Explosion by Mark Curtis Anderson and What Narcissism Means to Me by Tony Hoagland.

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Weighing Words Over Last Wishes

by M. A. Orthofer

News and Trends

Posted 11.1.03

November/December 2003

British poet and novelist Thomas Hardy, author of Tess of the D’Urbervilles and The Return of the Native, among other literary classics, wanted his personal papers burned after his death. In 1928, a bonfire was dutifully lit but not everything was consigned to the flames. Hardy’s second wife, Florence, saved at least 12 notebooks filled with information and sources on which the author based his later works of fiction. Thomas Hardy’s ‘Facts’ Notebook, edited by William Greenslade and released this month by Ashgate Publishing, is only the most recent to appear.

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Learning Fiction Online: Are You Ready to Workshop on the Web?

by Catherine Wald

The Practical Writer

Posted 11.1.03

November/December 2003

For writers seeking a structured learning environment without geographical or scheduling restrictions, the Internet can be a viable alternative to the bricks-and-mortar classroom.

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An Interview With Poet August Kleinzahler

by Claudia La Rocco

Direct Quote

Online Only, posted 10.3.03

In November, Farrar, Straus and Giroux will publish August Kleinzahler's eleventh book of poetry, The Strange Hours Travelers Keep. A loner and a traveler himself, Kleinzahler has avoided the cloistered life of academia for stints as a logger in British Columbia, a political commentator in Germany and, most recently, a music columnist for the San Diego Weekly Reader.

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Watching Seinfeld With Richard Yates: Postcard From New York City

by Therese Eiben

Postcard

Online Only, posted 9.25.03

Thanks in part to Stewart O'Nan, whose essay, "The Lost World of Richard Yates," appeared in the October/November 1999 issue of the Boston Review, readers are enjoying a long-overdue critical re-appreciation of the author of Revolutionary Road and The Easter Parade, among a handful of other exquisitely written books.

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Critics on Reviews

by Mary Gannon

Feature

Posted 9.1.03

September/October 2003

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Reviewers are accused of having agendas and of cronyism, are called show-offs and career-killers. It's a lot of heat to take for some free books, a few bucks, and a byline.

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Watch Out: Seajay Launches BTWOF

by Courtney E. Martin

News and Trends

Posted 9.1.03

September/October 2003

Carol Seajay, former publisher of Feminist Bookstore News, a San Francisco–based magazine that covered the feminist, gay, and lesbian book industry until folding in 2000, recently launched Books to Watch Out For, a series of monthly e-mail newsletters featuring reviews of gay and lesbian books. 

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Literary MagNet

by Kevin Larimer

News and Trends

Posted 9.1.03

September/October 2003

Literary MagNet chronicles the start-ups and closures, successes and failures, anniversaries and accolades, changes of editorship and special issues—in short, the news and trends—of literary magazines in America. This issue's MagNet features Poetry, Poems & Plays, the Sow’s Ear Poetry Review, Bloom, the Harvard Advocate, Harvard Review, Meanjin, and Vallum. 

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New Editor Picks O. Henry Winners

by Timothy Schaffert

News and Trends

Posted 9.1.03

September/October 2003

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Laura Furman, the first female O. Henry series editor in more than forty years, has instituted some changes to the process of selecting stories for her first volume, due out next month from Anchor.

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Dana Gioia's NEA: Art for the Masses

by Dalia Sofer

News and Trends

Posted 9.1.03

September/October 2003

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Since Dana Gioia was named chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts in January, the organization has awarded nearly $1 million to poets and translators of poetry and over $2 million to literary arts organizations. But the highest profile project of Gioia’s term so far begins this month, when six theater companies—from New York City; Chicago; Minneapolis; Little Rock, Arkansas; and Portland, Oregon—will begin a yearlong tour of 100 small and midsized cities across the U.S. to perform a selection of plays by William Shakespeare. A seventh theater company will tour 16 U.S. military bases.

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