Articles

Articles from Poet & Writers Magazine include material from the print edition plus exclusive online-only material.

Amazon Expands Search Function

by Doug Diesenhaus

News and Trends

Posted 7.1.05

July/August 2005

In case anyone was wondering, the four most frequently used words in T.S. Eliot’s 1943 collection Four Quartets are “time,” “past,” “fire,” and “end.” It is this kind of information that can be found by using one of several new features recently added to Amazon.com’s “Search Inside the Book” function, launched in October 2003. 

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Page One: Where New and Noteworthy Books Begin

by Staff

News and Trends

Posted 7.1.05

July/August 2005

Page One features a sample of titles we think you'll want to explore. With this installment, we offer excerpts from Evening Ferry by Katherine Towler and Little Beauties by Kim Addonizio.

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Q&A: C. Michael Curtis's Fiction Issues

by Timothy Schaffert

News and Trends

Posted 7.1.05

July/August 2005

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C. Michael Curtis, a senior editor at the Atlantic Monthly, who is known not only for selecting award-winning short stories but also for his considerate and sensible letters of rejection to the thousands of submissions he’s read over the years, spoke about the magazine’s new approach to publishing fiction.

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Resuscitating Poetry Recitation

by Kevin Canfield

News and Trends

Posted 7.1.05

July/August 2005

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The National Endowment for the Arts and the Poetry Foundation recently completed the pilot phase of a new program designed to raise the profile of poetry in high schools.

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Small Press Points

by Kevin Larimer

News and Trends

Posted 7.1.05

July/August 2005

Small Press Points highlights the happenings of the small press players. This issue features McSweeney’s Books, Believer Books, Tell Tale Press, and Wings Press.

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Myths We Live By, But Shouldn't: A Writer's Guide to Reality

by David Galef

The Practical Writer

Posted 7.1.05

July/August 2005

Perhaps because many writers and their adherents are poorly paid and often go unrecognized, they cultivate a variety of myths—some about the creative process, others about the profession itself—to justify what they do, to cheer themselves up, to inhabit a mystique.

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The Transformation of James Frey

by Daniel Nester

Feature

Posted 7.1.05

July/August 2005

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Two years after publishing a brutal, unflinching account of his drug addiction, James Frey is showing signs of becoming a kinder, gentler writer in his second memoir, My Friend Leonard.

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The Contester: Who's Doing What to Keep Them Clean

by Kevin Larimer

News and Trends

Posted 7.1.05

July/August 2005

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Unfortunately, these days it is not the quality of the award-winning writing that gets people talking; it is the way in which contests are run and the manner in which winners are chosen—or not chosen, as the case may be—that attract attention.

 

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Fear of Flight: Rewriting Short Fiction as a Novel

by Ginger Strand

The Practical Writer

Posted 5.1.05

May/June 2005

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In April 2003, an agent sat down with me, pointed to my manuscript, and said the words I had been dreading: I think this should be a novel. I shuddered. I was no novelist. I was a minimalist, a votress of the goddess of gesture, a worshipper at the altar of the succinct. I was a short story writer.

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Page One: Where New and Noteworthy Books Begin

by Staff

News and Trends

Posted 5.1.05

May/June 2005

Page One features a sample of titles we think you'll want to explore. With this installment, we offer excerpts from Haunted by Chuck Palahniuk, Bitter Milk by John McManus, and The Lake, The River & the Other Lake by Steve Amick.

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