Articles

Articles from Poet & Writers Magazine include material from the print edition plus exclusive online-only material.

Professor Palahniuk? Not Quite

by Jeff Sartain

News and Trends

Posted 3.1.04

March/April 2004

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In January, Chuck Palahniuk began teaching a free yearlong writers workshop that doesn't appear in the course listings for any college, university, or community arts center. Forget about academic credits—Palahniuk's workshop exists entirely online.

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Academy Rolls Out Red Carpet in April

by Mary Gannon

News and Trends

Posted 3.1.04

March/April 2004

How to herald National Poetry Month, year nine? Look to the stars. That's what the Academy of American Poets will do on April 6 in New York City. 

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Literary MagNet

by Kevin Larimer

News and Trends

Posted 3.1.04

March/April 2004

Literary MagNet chronicles the start-ups and closures, successes and failures, anniversaries and accolades, changes of editorship and special issues—in short, the news and trends—of literary magazines in America. This issue's MagNet features Tameme, Translation Review, Double Change, Circumference, Quick Fiction, the Paris Review, the Virginia Quarterly Review, Diagram, Tiferet: A Journal of Spiritual Literature, Glut, and Bullfight: A Literary Review.

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Small Press Points

by Kevin Larimer

News and Trends

Posted 3.1.04

March/April 2004

Small Press Points highlights the happenings of the small press players. This issue features Story Line Press, Sarabande Books, Anon. Books, and Rain Taxi.

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Before and After National Poetry Month

by Kevin Larimer

News and Trends

Posted 3.1.04

March/April 2004

Thanks to muscular marketing and persistent promoting—notable traits of the Academy of American Poets—April has been established as the month to appreciate poetry. But there are other designated days and months during which everyone can celebrate creative writing, both as an art form and as yet another way to turn an average day into a holiday. 

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Page One: Where New and Noteworthy Books Begin

by Staff

News and Trends

Posted 3.1.04

March/April 2004

Page One features a sample of titles we think you'll want to explore. With this installment, we offer excerpts from Vanishing Point by David Markson and Sky Girl by Rosemary Griggs.

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An Interview With Poet Susan Atefat-Peckham

by Jodie Ahern

Direct Quote

Online Only, posted 2.12.04

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Poet Susan Atefat-Peckham and her six-year-old son were killed in a car accident in Ghor Safi, Jordan, on February 7, 2004. A professor in the MFA program at Georgia College & State University, Atefat-Peckham was in the Middle East as a Fulbright scholar teaching creative writing at the University of Jordan. She was 33. The following Direct Quote was originally posted on October 12, 2001, following the publication of her book That Kind of Sleep.

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Measures of Success: What Publishing Your Book Really Means

by Duncan Murrell

The Literary Life

Posted 1.1.04

January/February 2004

At some point every writer must turn her attention from the art of creating to the business of selling. And while many authors would like to avoid the industry altogether, a basic understanding of it—from the top five houses to the independents—is an unavoidable necessity.

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High Lonesome: Wyoming's Ucross and Jentel

by Lisa A. Phillips

Special Section

Posted 1.1.04

March/April 2004

Northeastern Wyoming is a rugged place, where the ruins of turn-of-the-century homesteads still stand in the tall grass, and communities gather every spring to watch cowboys wrestle their calves down for branding. An average of five people per mile populate this High Plains landscape of low, bison-backed hills and rushing creeks. Such rough, isolated grace makes the region an ideal, though unexpected, environment for an artists colony—or better yet, two of them.

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Page One: Where New and Noteworthy Books Begin

by Staff

News and Trends

Posted 1.1.04

January/February 2004

Page One features a sample of titles we think you'll want to explore. With this installment, we offer excerpts from The Epicure's Lament by Kate Christensen and Sad Little Breathing Machine by Matthea Harvey.

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