Articles

Articles from Poet & Writers Magazine include material from the print edition plus exclusive online-only material.

Press Dresses Up the Queens of Pulp

by Dalia Sofer

News and Trends

Posted 11.1.03

November/December 2003

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This month the world’s first independent publisher of women’s writing, the Feminist Press, launches a steamy—and unlikely—series of pulp fiction titles.

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The Stones of Summer Rolls Back

by Nick Twemlow

News and Trends

Posted 11.1.03

November/December 2003

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A simple film about the solitary pleasures of reading has turned into a successful campaign to revive a short-lived literary career. Dow Mossman’s only novel, The Stones of Summer, was originally published in 1972 by the now-defunct press Bobbs-Merrill. After being lauded by John Seelye in the New York Times Book Review as “a marvelous achievement” that offered “fulfillment at the first stroke, which is so often the sign of superior talent,” the book went out of print and its author faded into obscurity. Last month it was reissued by Barnes & Noble Books.

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Page One: Where New and Noteworthy Books Begin

by Staff

News and Trends

Posted 11.1.03

November/December 2003

Page One features a sample of titles we think you'll want to explore. With this installment, we offer excerpts from Jesus Sound Explosion by Mark Curtis Anderson and What Narcissism Means to Me by Tony Hoagland.

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An Interview With Poet August Kleinzahler

by Claudia La Rocco

Direct Quote

Online Only, posted 10.3.03

In November, Farrar, Straus and Giroux will publish August Kleinzahler's eleventh book of poetry, The Strange Hours Travelers Keep. A loner and a traveler himself, Kleinzahler has avoided the cloistered life of academia for stints as a logger in British Columbia, a political commentator in Germany and, most recently, a music columnist for the San Diego Weekly Reader.

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Watching Seinfeld With Richard Yates: Postcard From New York City

by Therese Eiben

Postcard

Online Only, posted 9.25.03

Thanks in part to Stewart O'Nan, whose essay, "The Lost World of Richard Yates," appeared in the October/November 1999 issue of the Boston Review, readers are enjoying a long-overdue critical re-appreciation of the author of Revolutionary Road and The Easter Parade, among a handful of other exquisitely written books.

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Watch Out: Seajay Launches BTWOF

by Courtney E. Martin

News and Trends

Posted 9.1.03

September/October 2003

Carol Seajay, former publisher of Feminist Bookstore News, a San Francisco–based magazine that covered the feminist, gay, and lesbian book industry until folding in 2000, recently launched Books to Watch Out For, a series of monthly e-mail newsletters featuring reviews of gay and lesbian books. 

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Page One: Where New and Noteworthy Books Begin

by Staff

News and Trends

Posted 9.1.03

September/October 2003

Page One features a sample of titles we think you'll want to explore. With this installment, we offer excerpts from Bring Me Your Saddest Arizona by Ryan Harty, Indiana, Indiana by Laird Hunt, and Eyeshot by Heather McHugh.

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New Editor Picks O. Henry Winners

by Timothy Schaffert

News and Trends

Posted 9.1.03

September/October 2003

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Laura Furman, the first female O. Henry series editor in more than forty years, has instituted some changes to the process of selecting stories for her first volume, due out next month from Anchor.

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The Narrative Approach to Science

by Dalia Sofer

News and Trends

Posted 9.1.03

September/October 2003

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David Foster Wallace’s long-awaited sixth book will arrive in bookstores next month. But it’s not what some might expect from the author of Infinite Jest and A Supposedly Fun Thing I’ll Never Do Again.

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Dana Gioia's NEA: Art for the Masses

by Dalia Sofer

News and Trends

Posted 9.1.03

September/October 2003

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Since Dana Gioia was named chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts in January, the organization has awarded nearly $1 million to poets and translators of poetry and over $2 million to literary arts organizations. But the highest profile project of Gioia’s term so far begins this month, when six theater companies—from New York City; Chicago; Minneapolis; Little Rock, Arkansas; and Portland, Oregon—will begin a yearlong tour of 100 small and midsized cities across the U.S. to perform a selection of plays by William Shakespeare. A seventh theater company will tour 16 U.S. military bases.

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