Articles

Articles from Poet & Writers Magazine include material from the print edition plus exclusive online-only material.

Mr. Wolfe, You Can Go Home Again

by Suzanne Pettypiece

News and Trends

Posted 7.1.03

July/August 2003

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Five years ago, in the early morning of July 24, 1998, Thomas Wolfe’s childhood home in Asheville, North Carolina, was nearly destroyed by fire. Since then, conservation specialists and staff at the Thomas Wolfe Memorial have worked to reconstruct the museum and hope to reopen it this fall.

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B&N Launches Classics Imprint

by Dalia Sofer

News and Trends

Posted 7.1.03

July/August 2003

They don’t command the best-seller lists, nor do they show up on reviewers’ desks, but the classics—those books of enduring quality that year after year grace high school and college syllabi and circulate in community book clubs—are the cash cows of the publishing industry: reliable, predictable, and above all, steady sources of revenue. Penguin Classics, Oxford World’s Classics, Bantam Classics, Dover Publications, and the Modern Library are among the leading publishers of their kind in the United States. This spring, Barnes & Noble joined them with its own imprint: Barnes & Noble Classics.

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Editors on Reviews

by Jane Ciabattari

Feature

Posted 7.1.03

July/August 2003

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Book review editors—those powerful yet inundated tastemakers who choose from the more than 130,000 new books published each year the mere shelfful that are reviewed—get used to (and bored with) having nasty motives ascribed to them. This second installment of a three-part series on book reviews examines the subject at hand from the perspective of the assigning editors, who would like to set the record straight.

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An Interview With Poet Mark Doty

by Jaclyn Friedman

Direct Quote

Online Only, posted 5.23.03

Mark Doty's work has always straddled the line between a sense of belonging and alienation, so it's no surprise to find the crucial question, Where do I live? at the heart of his forthcoming book

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The Door of the Soul: Postcard From Tuscia

by Linda Lappin

Postcard

Online Only, posted 5.23.03

D.H. Lawrence returned to Italy in 1927 after a soul-searching journey through Mexico, the American Southwest, Ceylon, Australia, and New Zealand. Gravely ill with tuberculosis, unaware of how little time he had left (he died three years later at the age of 44), Lawrence sought an ideal land where he might flourish as a "whole man alive" and find an antidote for the alienation of industrialized society.

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Literary MagNet

by Kevin Larimer

News and Trends

Posted 5.1.03

May/June 2003

Literary MagNet chronicles the start-ups and closures, successes and failures, anniversaries and accolades, changes of editorship and special issues—in short, the news and trends—of literary magazines in America. This issue's MagNet features Maize, Our Time Is Now, UR-VOX, Smartish Pace, and the Beloit Poetry Journal.

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Remembering Amanda Davis

by Heidi Julavits

News and Trends

Posted 5.1.03

May/June 2003

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Amanda Davis, author of the short story collection Circling the Drain and cornerstone presence to many in and beyond the literary world, died in a plane crash on March 15, 2003, while on tour promoting her first novel, Wonder When You'll Miss Me.

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Tasini Quits NWU for Global Coalition

by Joy Jacobson

News and Trends

Posted 5.1.03

May/June 2003

Last month Jonathan Tasini, who is recognizable to most writers due to his association with the high-profile lawsuit against the New York Times, resigned as president of the National Writers Union, an advocacy group for freelance writers and is now heading the Creators Federation, an international coalition of writers and artists working in all media and the organizations that represent them.

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A First-Timer Reveals How It Feels

by Steve Almond

Special Section

Posted 5.1.03

May/June 2003

Last April (the 22nd, to be exact), I received an advance copy of the New York Times review of my debut story collection. The piece, which appeared in the Sunday Book Review, began as follows: "There's a postadolescent period many of us would rather forget: that summer or decade when we have no idea what we're doing. Days are measured in beer, TV and dead-end jobs. It is a dull time to live through, and duller still to read about. "Which doesn't stop young writers from writing about it."

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Celebrating Niedecker's Centennial

by Robyn Schiff

News and Trends

Posted 5.1.03

May/June 2003

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This year marks the centennial of Niedecker's birth. To celebrate, libraries and bookstores in her home state are planning a series of events that will draw poets, scholars, and readers to the places that inspired and influenced her poetry.

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