Deadline Approaches for Thurber House Residency Award

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Posted 5.23.14 by Prize Reporter

Submissions are currently open for the Thurber House’s John E. Nance Writer-in-Residence award. The four-week residency is offered from September to October 2014 to a fiction writer or nonfiction writer who has had a book published within the past three years. The resident will be provided with a $4,000 stipend and a two-bedroom apartment in the former home of fiction writer and cartoonist James Thurber in Columbus, Ohio. Travel and food are not included. The resident is also asked to participate in three community outreach activities offered by the Thurber House, such as giving readings or teaching writing classes.

To apply, submit two copies of a book published in the past three years, along with three short stories, essays, or chapters of a novel or book of nonfiction with an optional table of contents totaling no more than 50 pages by June 2. There is no entry fee. Self-published books are not eligible. Submissions should be mailed with the required entry form to Thurber House, 77 Jefferson Avenue, Columbus, OH 43215. The resident will be chosen by July 7.

Born and raised in Columbus, Ohio, James Thurber (1894-1961) was a prolific humorist, short story writer, and cartoonist. Though he spent most of his career in New York City, Thurber attended college in Ohio and worked at the Columbus Dispatch as a reporter from 1920 to 1924. He is buried in Columbus’s Greenlawn Cemetery.

Established in 2012 by Sally Crane, the annual John E. Nance Writer-in-Residence award is named after John Nance, a photojournalist who was the Thurber House writer-in-residence in 1995 and 1998. Previous residents include fiction writer Katrina Kittle and creative nonfiction writer Liza Monroy.

Comments

tomandterry1977... says...

I'm not submitting, however, I wanted to say that I love James Thurber for one reason:

On February 25, 1956, he was visiting an inn in CT that my parents owned.  He made a drawing for them, iconic in its content and signed the back as did all of his OMNIBUS crew that were with him.  The next day, I was born.  I've since reframed and preserved it.  I'm sitting here in my office looking at it right now.  He 's my writing buddy and helps me insert the ridiculous into my writing when it's necessary.  My muse, or one of them.

Terry in Georgia, Vermont

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