Literary Organizations

Literary Organizations

Posted 2.8.08

  • Introduction
  • Other Resources

Introduction

There are many literary organizations that can help writers in a variety of ways. Poets & Writers offers a number of resources that can be useful to writers, including Poets & Writers Magazine; pw.org; the Readings & Workshops program, which funds writers in New York State, California, Atlanta, Chicago, Detroit, Houston, New Orleans, Seattle, Washington, D.C., and Tucson; and Information Services, which provides answers to questions writers may have about publishing. Information Services also edits and maintains The Directory of Poets and Writers.

There are both regional and national literary organizations that help writers by providing them with resources, technical assistance, grants, awards, readings and workshops. The Academy of American Poets supports poets at all stages of their careers. PEN American Center defends freedom of expression and offers grants to writers and translators. The Authors Guild is a national membership organization that provides advice on contracts. The National Writers Union is a labor union representing freelance writers.

Other Resources

You can find other literary organizations by conducting an online search, contacting your local librarian, checking with the creative writing or English department of a local college or university, and browsing in the resource sections of bookstores.

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Comments

weatherwrite says...

Hey 57, nice to digitally me you. I'm 55 on a mission, strangely enough I began my attempt at writing when I too was only 15. My story has similarites but I have written a variety of works and currently working on a full length novel. I want to say write your ass off and remember to travel with the pen using your hand but in the wind!

  The Best to you

 Darnell

 

bettydaviseyes says...

Hello gentlemen, I too am 54 and started writing poetry precisely when I was 15. 

My dad beat me when he saw that I was writing poetry inside the closet instead of being outside playing baseball or throwing jacks.  Around the age of 25, after years of dark poetry, in a dark closet, with beat marks all over me I decided to come out of the closet with a bang....of a 12 gauge shotgun.  That is a figurative 12 gauge, as I really just decided that I needed to abandon my dads might fist and become a Rogue Poet. I hit the streets and preached haikus to all the kids down at the skate rink. Unfortunatley, I was laughed out of the building.  The frustration of not being accepted for a poet made fall into a deep rage.  That's when I gave up my quarter lif of poetry and began to sell machinery that produced bending straws. The business was good until my dad showed back up in my life and stole my car that had the bendy straw machines in the trunk. So I was out of a job again and had to start over. I went to another skate rink and met a woman that knew how to skate backwards on eight wheels.  Once she turned around and faced me I saw...her eyes. Please continue to read below.

Her hair is Harlow gold, her lips sweet surprise
Her hands are never cold, she's got Bette Davis eyes
She'll turn the music on you, you won't have to think twice
She's pure as New York snow, she got Bette Davis eyes

And she'll tease you, she'll unease you
All the better just to please you
She's precocious
And she knows just what it takes to make a pro blush
She got Greta Garbo standoff sighs, she's got Bette Davis eyes

She'll let you take her home, it whets her appetite
She'll lay you on the throne, she got Bette Davis eyes
She'll take a tumble on you, roll you like you were dice
Until you come up blue, she's got Bette Davis eyes

She'll expose you, when she snows you
Hope you'll feed with the crumbs she throws you
She's ferocious
And she knows just what it takes to make a pro blush
All the boys think she's a spy, she's got Bette Davis eyes

And she'll tease you, she'll unease you
All the better just to please you
She's precocious
And she knows just what it takes to make a pro blush
All the boys think she's a spy, she's got Bette Davis eyes

She'll tease you, she'll unease you
Just to please you, she's got Bette Davis eyes
She'll expose you when she snows you
She knows you, she's got Bette Davis Eyes

vertabeary says...

Hello there.  I am a 57 year old Poet. I have been writing since I was 15 years old.  I am coming out of the writing closet with a bang.  I have wonderful reviews and my poetry is discribed as accessible.  I call myself the Rogue Poet because I follow no rules and I try to make my poetry very easy to unstand and honest.  Looking forward to getting involved. 

Jaded1170 says...

I'm 51 as well.... I've been writing poetry since I was 15... started in my parents' attic by candle-light  lol  Yes, people read my poetry and I get really positive responses from half and my favorite response: "It's got merit, but it just seems too inaccessible." from the other half.

Cerio23 says...

I am 51 years old. I have been writing poems since I was 7 years old. The older ones are gone but I have many, many poems that I keep in a storage box in my closet. I have decided to get them out and do them some justice.

This is not to say that no one has read my poetry. Indeed they have!!!!! And people seem to either love it or they do not understand it. Nothing in between for the most part. So, I'm com'in, I'm com'in out...I want the world to see, all of my poetry....hahahahahaha...and yes I am reading all about copyrights.

So HELLO EVERYBODY!!!!!!!!!

lilly at dusk says...

i hope through this i can become a good poet in the future...

ali wahag says...
I hope that i can find many resources by this site to improve my poetry and other writings.

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