Recent Winners

Academy of American Poets
Walt Whitman Award
Mai Der Vang of Fresno, California, won the 2016 Walt Whitman Award for her poetry collection, Afterland. She received $5,000; a six-week all-expenses-paid residency at the Civitella Ranieri Center in Umbria, Italy; and publication of her book by Graywolf Press in April 2017. Copies of her book will be distributed to thousands of the Academy of American Poets members. Carolyn Forché judged. The annual award is given to a poet who has not published a poetry collection in a standard edition. The next deadline is November 1.
Academy of American Poets, Walt Whitman Award, 75 Maiden Lane, Suite 901, New York, NY 10038. (212) 274-0343, ext. 13. Patricia Guzman, Programs Coordinator.
awards@poets.org
www.poets.org/academy-american-poets/prizes/walt-whitman-award

American Academy of Arts and Letters
Literature Awards
Eighteen writers received awards in literature from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. Fiction writer Adam Haslett of New York City and fiction and nonfiction writer Jesmyn Ward of DeLisle, Louisiana, received the $200,000 Mildred and Harold Strauss Livings awards, given occasionally to prose writers. Poet Henri Cole of Boston received the $25,000 Award of Merit Medal, given annually to a poet, fiction writer, playwright, visual artist, or sculptor. Poet Sinéad Morrissey of Belfast received the $20,000 E. M. Forster Award, given annually to a young writer from the United Kingdom or Ireland for a stay in the United States; Alison Lurie and Colm Tóibín judged. Fiction writer Kathryn Davis of Saint Louis received the $20,000 Katherine Anne Porter Award Award, given biennially to a prose writer. Fiction writer Rachel Kushner of Los Angeles received the $20,000 Harold D. Vursell Memorial Award, given annually to a writer whose work merits recognition for the quality of its prose style. Translator Jamey Gambrell of New York City received the $20,000 Thornton Wilder Prize for Translation, given occasionally to a practitioner, scholar, or patron who has made a significant contribution to the art of literary translation. Arts and Letters Awards in Literature, which honor writers of exceptional talent, were given to poets Terrance Hayes of Pittsburgh, Katie Peterson of Woodland, California, and Spencer Reece of Juno Beach, Florida; fiction writer Joshua Ferris of New York City; nonfiction writer Ta-Nehisi Coates of Paris; and translator Mark Polizzotti of New York City. They each received $10,000. Fiction writer James Hannaham of New York City received the $10,000 Morton Dauwen Zabel Award, given biennially to a fiction writer with progressive, original, and experimental tendencies. Anthony Marra of Oakland, California, won the $10,000 Rosenthal Family Foundation Award for his story collection, The Tsar of Love and Techno (Hogarth, 2015). The annual award honors a book published in the previous year. Kirsten Valdez Quade of Ann Arbor, Michigan, received the $5,000 Sue Kaufman Prize for First Fiction for her story collection, Night at the Fiestas (W. W. Norton, 2015). The annual award honors a first work of fiction published in the previous year. Fiction writers Jack Livings of New York City and Matthew Neill Null of Provincetown, Massachusetts, each received a Rome Fellowship in Literature and will spend a year in residence at the American Academy in Rome. The annual awards are given by members of the Academy; this year’s selection committee included John Guare, Sharon Olds, Anne Tyler, Rosanna Warren, and Joy Williams. There is no application process.
American Academy of Arts and Letters, 633 West 155th Street, New York, NY 10032. (212) 368-5900.
academy@artsandletters.org
www.artsandletters.org

American Literary Review
Literary Awards
John Sibley Williams of Portland, Oregon, won the 2015 American Literary Review award in poetry for his poem "Fog." Rebecca Foust of Kentfield, California, won the award in short fiction for her story "Something Blue." Kate Angus of New York City won the award in creative nonfiction for her essay "When We Were Vikings." They each received $1,000, and their winning pieces were published in American Literary Review. Gregory Fraser judged in poetry, Garth Greenwell judged in fiction, and Jill Talbot judged in creative nonfiction. The annual awards are given for a poem, a short story, and an essay. The next deadline is October 1.
American Literary Review, Literary Awards, University of North Texas, 1155 Union Circle #311307, Denton, TX 76203. americanliteraryreview@gmail.com
www.americanliteraryreview.com

American Poetry Review
Honickman First Book Prize
Heather Tone of West Palm Beach, Florida, won the 19th annual APR/Honickman First Book Prize for her poetry collection, Likenesses. She received $3,000, and her collection will be published in September by American Poetry Review with distribution by Copper Canyon Press through Consortium. Nick Flynn judged. The annual award is given for a poetry collection by a writer who has not published a book of poems. The next deadline is October 31.
American Poetry Review, Honickman First Book Prize, 320 South Broad Street, Hamilton #313, Philadelphia, PA 19102.
www.aprweb.org

A Room of Her Own Foundation
Orlando Prizes
Four writers received the Fall 2015 Orlando Prizes. They are Allison Adair of Brookline, Massachusetts, for her poem "Flight Theory"; Leigh Claire Schmidli of Berea, Kentucky, for her short story "Grow Heavy"; Ingrid Jendrzejewski of Cambridge, England, for her short short story "The Immaculate Heart of Mary: Steel City, 1910"; and Beth Ann Fennelly of Oxford, Mississippi, for her essay "Goner." They each received $1,000, and their winning works were published in Los Angeles Review. Cheryl Boyce-Taylor judged in poetry; Megan Abbott judged in short fiction; Anne Finger judged in short short fiction; and Sue William Silverman judged in creative nonfiction. The awards are given twice yearly for a poem, a short story, a short short story, and an essay by a woman writer. The awards are currently on hiatus.
A Room of Her Own Foundation, P.O. Box 778, Placitas, NM 87043. (505) 867-5373. Tracey Cravens-Gras, Associate Director.
tracey@aroho.org
www.aroho.org

Augsburg College
Howling Bird Press Literary Prize
Jacob M. Appel of New York City won the second annual Howling Bird Press Literary Prize in fiction for his collection The Topless Widow of Herkimer Street and Other Stories. He received $1,000, and his book will be published by Howling Bird Press in the fall. The editors judged. The annual award is given in alternating years for a poetry collection, a short story collection or novel, and a work of nonfiction. The 2017 award will be given in nonfiction; the deadline is June 30.
Augsburg College, Howling Bird Press Literary Prize, MFA in Creative Writing, Graduate Studies Department, 2211 Riverside Avenue, Minneapolis, MN 55455.
www.augsburg.edu/mfa/howling-bird-press

Barnes & Noble
Discover Awards
Mia Alvar of New York City won the 2015 Discover Award in Fiction for her story collection, In the Country (Knopf). She received $30,000. Angela Flournoy of New York City won the $15,000 second-place prize for her novel, The Turner House (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt), and Sophie McManus of New York City won the $7,500 third-place prize for her novel, The Unfortunates (Farrar, Straus and Giroux). Eleanor Brown, Ben Fountain, and Thrity Umrigar judged. Jill Leovy of Los Angeles won the $30,000 Discover Award in Nonfiction for her book, Ghettoside: A True Story of Murder in America (Spiegel & Grau). George Hodgman of New York City and Paris, Missouri, won the $15,000 second-place prize for his memoir, Bettyville (Viking), and Amy Ellis Nutt of Washington D.C. won the $7,500 third-place prize for her book Becoming Nicole: The Transformation of an American Family (Random House). Scott Anderson, Candice Millard, and Cheryl Strayed judged. The annual awards are given for works of fiction and nonfiction published during the previous year and featured in Barnes & Noble's Discover Great New Writers program. There is no application process.
Barnes & Noble, 122 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10011. (212) 633-4067. Miwa Messer, Director.
mmesser@bn.com
www.barnesandnoble.com/discover

Bauhan Publishing
May Sarton New Hampshire Poetry Prize
Desirée Alvarez of New York City won the 2015 May Sarton New Hampshire Poetry Prize for her poetry collection Devil’s Paintbrush. She received $1,000, and her book was published by Bauhan Publishing. Mekeel McBride judged. The annual award is given for a poetry collection. The next deadline is June 30.
Bauhan Publishing, May Sarton New Hampshire Poetry Prize, P.O. Box 117, Peterborough, NH 03458.
(603) 567-4430.
www.bauhanpublishing.com/contest

Black Lawrence Press
St. Lawrence Book Award
Thomas Cotsonas of New York City won the 2015 St. Lawrence Book Award for his story collection, Nominal Cases. He received $1,000, and his collection will be published by Black Lawrence Press. The editors judged. The annual award is given for a debut collection of poems or short stories. (See Deadlines.)
Black Lawrence Press, St. Lawrence Book Award, 326 Bigham Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15211.
editors@blacklawrencepress.com
www.blacklawrence.com/submissions-and-contests/the-st-lawrence-book-award

Blue Metropolis
International Literary Grand Prize
Anne Carson of New York City and Ann Arbor, Michigan, won the 17th annual Blue Metropolis International Literary Grand Prize. Carson, whose most recent work is the poetry collection Red Doc> (Knopf, 2013), received $10,000 Canadian (approximately $7,800) and travel expenses to participate in the 2016 Blue Metropolis Literary Festival in Montreal. Philippe Bélanger, Jason Grimmer, Marie-Andrée Lamontagne, Stephen Powell, and Anakana Schofield judged. The annual award honors the lifetime literary achievement of a poet, a fiction writer, or a creative nonfiction writer. There is no application process.
Premio Metropolis Azul Literary Prize
Valeria Luiselli of New York City won the fourth annual Premio Metropolis Azul Literary Prize for her novel The Story of My Teeth (Coffee House Press, 2015). She received $5,000 Canadian (approximately $3,900) and travel expenses to participate in the 2016 Blue Metropolis Literary Festival in Montreal. Ingrid Bejerman, Gregory McCormick, Ruth Shine, and Ginny Stikeman judged. The annual award is given for a work of fiction written in English, French, or Spanish that explores some aspect of Hispanophone culture or history. There is no application process.
Words to Change Prize
Abdourahman Waberi of Washington D.C. won the second annual Words to Change Prize for his novels La Divine Chanson (Editions Zulma, 2015) and In the United States of Africa (University of Nebraska Press, 2009). He received $5,000 Canadian (approximately $3,900) and travel expenses to participate in the 2016 Blue Metropolis Literary Festival in Montreal. The annual award is given for one or more works of fiction or nonfiction that promote the values of multiculturalism and linguistic, ethnic, or religious diversity. There is no application process.
First Peoples Literary Prize
Thomas King of Guelph, Canada, won the second annual First Peoples Literary Prize for his novel The Back of the Turtle (HarperCollins, 2014). He received $5,000 Canadian (approximately $3,900) and travel expenses to participate in the 2016 Blue Metropolis Literary Festival in Montreal. The annual award is given for a work by a writer who is First Nations, Métis, or Inuit of Canada. There is no application process
Literary Diversity Prize for a First Publication
Ghayas Hachem of Montreal won the inaugural Literary Diversity Prize for a First Publication for his novel, Play Boys (Editions Boreal, 2014). The prize is cosponsored by the Conseil des arts de Montréal. He received $3,000 Canadian (approximately $2,340). Gregory McCormick, Rodney Saint-Éloi, and Kim Thúy judged. The annual award is given for a first book in any genre written in English or French by a Montreal-based writer who is a first- or second-generation migrant from a multicultural community. There is no application process.
Blue Metropolis, 661 Rose de Lima Street, Suite 201, Montreal QC H4C 2L7, Canada. (514) 932-1112.
info@bluemetropolis.org
www.bluemetropolis.org

Bronx Council on the Arts
BRIO Awards
Poets Rachel Ansong and José Olivarez, fiction writer Jon Lewis-Katz, nonfiction writers Chiseche Salome Mibenge and A. A. Weiss, and spoken word artist Jose Batista-Ayala, all of New York City, received 2015 BRIO Awards. They each received $3,000. The annual grants are given to writers who reside in the Bronx in New York City. As of this writing, the next deadline has not been set.
Bronx Council on the Arts, BRIO Awards, 1738 Hone Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461. (718) 931-9500.
brio@bronxarts.org
www.bronxarts.org/brio.asp

Centenary College of Louisiana
John William Corrington Award
George Singleton of Spartanburg, South Carolina, won the 2015–2016 John William Corrington Award for Literary Excellence. Singleton, whose most recent book is the story collection Calloustown (Dzanc Books, 2015), received $2,000. The annual award is given to recognize a career of dedication to literary excellence. There is no application process.
Centenary College of Louisiana, English Department, Shreveport, LA 71134. (318) 869-5085. David Havird, Coordinator.
www.centenary.edu/academics/english/corrington

Center for Fiction
Christopher Doheny Award
Catherine Kapphahn of New York City won the 2015 Christopher Doheny Award for her manuscript "Stories You Never Told Me." She received $10,000, production and promotion of the book as an Audible e-book, and assistance from Audible to pursue print publication of her book. Michelle Bailat-Jones, Charles Bock, Mike Scalise, and two representatives from Audible judged. The annual award is given for a full-length fiction or nonfiction manuscript about serious physical illness by a writer who has personal experience with life-threatening illness. The next deadline is December 15.
Center for Fiction, Christopher Doheny Award, 17 East 47th Street, New York, NY 10017. Sara Batkie, Writing Programs Director.
sara@centerforfiction.org
www.centerforfiction.org/awards/the-christopher-doheny-award

Center for Literary Publishing
Colorado Prize for Poetry
Mike Lala of New York City won the 22nd annual Colorado Prize for Poetry for his poetry collection, Exit Theater. He received $2,000, and his book will be published in November by the Center for Literary Publishing at Colorado State University. Tyrone Williams judged. The annual award is given for a poetry collection. The next deadline is January 14, 2017.
Center for Literary Publishing, Colorado Prize for Poetry, Colorado State University, 9105 Campus Delivery, Ft. Collins, CO 80523. (970) 491-5449. Stephanie G'Schwind, Director.
coloradoprize.colostate.edu

Claremont Graduate University
Tufts Poetry Awards
Ross Gay of Bloomington, Indiana, won the 24th annual Kingsley Tufts Poetry Award for Catalog of Unabashed Gratitude (University of Pittsburgh Press, 2015). He received $100,000 and a weeklong appointment as poet-in-residence at Claremont Graduate University. The annual award is given for a book of poetry by a midcareer poet published in the previous year. Danez Smith of Ann Arbor, Michigan, won the 23rd annual Kate Tufts Discovery Award for [insert] boy (YesYes Books, 2015). Smith received $10,000. The annual award is given for a first book of poetry published in the previous year. The judges for both awards were Stephen Burt, Elena Karina Byrne, Don Share, Brian Kim Stefans, and Chase Twichell. The next deadline is July 1. 
Claremont Graduate University, Tufts Poetry Awards, 160 East 10th Street, Harper East B7, Claremont, CA 91711. (909) 621-8974.
tufts@cgu.edu
www.cgu.edu/tufts

Cleveland Foundation
Anisfield-Wolf Book Awards
Rowan Ricardo Phillips of New York City and Barcelona won the 2015 Anisfield-Wolf Book Award in poetry for his collection Heaven (Farrar, Straus and Giroux). Mary Morris of New York City won the award in fiction for her novel The Jazz Palace (Nan A. Talese). Lillian Faderman of Fresno, California, and Brian Seibert of New York City split the award in nonfiction. Faderman won for her book The Gay Revolution: The Story of the Struggle (Simon & Schuster); Seibert won for his book What the Eye Hears: A History of Tap Dancing (Farrar, Straus and Giroux). Nonfiction writer Orlando Patterson of Boston won the Lifetime Achievement Award. Phillips, Morris, and Patterson each received $10,000; Faderman and Seibert each received $5,000. Rita Dove, Henry Louis Gates Jr., Joyce Carol Oates, Steven Pinker, and Simon Schama judged. The annual awards are given to honor books of poetry, fiction, or creative nonfiction published in the previous year that "contribute to society's understanding of racism and our appreciation of cultural diversity." The next deadline is December 31.
Cleveland Foundation, Anisfield-Wolf Book Awards, 1422 Euclid Avenue, Suite 1300, Cleveland, OH 44115. (216) 685-2018. Karen R. Long, Contact.
klong@clevefdn.org
www.anisfield-wolf.org

Codhill Press
Poetry Award
Mark Maire of Duluth, Minnesota, won the 2015 Codhill Poetry Award for his collection, Meridian. He received $1,000, publication of his book by Codhill Press, and 25 author copies. The annual award is given for a poetry collection. The next deadline is December 30.
Codhill Press, Poetry Award, P.O. Box 280, Bloomington, NY 12411. Pauline Uchmanowicz, Contest Coordinator.
www.codhill.com

DIAGRAM
Essay Contest
Oscar Cuevas of New York City won the 2015 Essay Contest for "Willful Deliverance." He received $1,000, and his essay was published in Volume 16, Issue 3 of DIAGRAM. Ander Monson and Nicole Walker judged. The annual award is given for an essay. The next deadline is December 31.
DIAGRAM, Essay Contest, University of Arizona, ML 445, P.O. Box 210067, Tucson, AZ 85721. Ander Monson, Editor.
editor@thediagram.com

thediagram.com

Dogfish Head Craft Brewed Ales
Poetry Prize
Faith Shearin of Gerrardstown, West Virginia, won the 2015 Dogfish Head Poetry Prize for her collection Orpheus, Turning. She received $500, publication by Broadkill River Press, ten author copies, and two cases of Dogfish Head beer. She received lodging expenses to give a reading at the Dogfish Head Brewery in Lewes, Delaware. James Arthur, Timothy Green, and Joyce Sutphen judged. The annual award is given for a poetry collection written by a poet living in Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Virginia, Washington D.C., or West Virginia. (See Deadlines.)
Dogfish Head Craft Brewed Ales, Poetry Prize, c/o Broadkill River Press, P.O. Box 63, Milton, DE 19968. Linda Blaskey, Contest Coordinator.
dogfishheadpoetryprize@earthlink.net
www.thebroadkillriverpress.com/dogfish-head-poetry-prize

Dogwood
Literary Prize
Anna Leahy of Pittsburgh won the 2016 Dogwood Literary Prize for her essay "Sweet Dreams Are Made of This." She received $1,000 and publication in the 2016 issue of Dogwood. Kate Hopper, Steven Schwartz, and Gail Wronsky judged. The annual award is given for a poem, a short story, or an essay. (See Deadlines.)
Dogwood, Literary Prize, Fairfield University, English Department, 1073 North Benson Road, Fairfield, CT 06824. (203) 254-4000, ext. 2565. Carol Ann Davis, Editor.
cdavis13@fairfield.edu
www.dogwoodliterary.com

Fish Publishing
Short Memoir Prize
Angela Readman of Newcastle Upon Tyne, England, won the 2016 Short Memoir Prize for “The Way I Tell It.” She received €1,000 (approximately $1,130) and publication in the 2016 Fish Anthology. Carlo Gebler judged. The annual award is given for an essay. The next deadline is January 31, 2017.
Fish Publishing, Short Memoir Prize, Durrus, Bantry, County Cork, Ireland. Clem Cairns, Editor.
info@fishpublishing.com
www.fishpublishing.com

Foundation for Contemporary Arts
Grants to Artists
Poet Renee Gladman of Providence, Rhode Island, received a 2016 artist grant. Gladman, whose most recent book is Calamities (Wave Books, 2016), received $40,000. The annual grants are given to poets, as well as visual and performance artists. There is no application process.
Foundation for Contemporary Arts, 820 Greenwich Street, New York, NY 10014. (212) 807-7077.
info@contemporaryarts.org
www.foundationforcontemporaryarts.org/grants

Fourteen Hills Press
Gina Berriault Award
Suzanne Rivecca of San Francisco won the 2016 Gina Berriault Award. Rivecca, whose most recent book is the story collection Death is Not an Option (Norton, 2010), received $500 and will be interviewed and have a short story published in Issue 23.1 of Fourteen Hills. Peter Orner judged. The annual award is given to a fiction writer "with a love of storytelling and a commitment to helping young writers." There is no application process.
Stacy Doris Memorial Poetry Award
Sahar Muradi of New York City won the 2016 Stacy Doris Memorial Poetry Award for her poem "Brink." She received $500, and her poem will be published in Issue 22.2 of Fourteen Hills. Chet Wiener judged. The annual award is given for a poem with an inventive spirit. The next deadline is January 15, 2017.
Fourteen Hills Press, San Francisco State University, Creative Writing Department, 1600 Holloway Avenue, San Francisco, CA 94123.
14hills.net

Friends of American Writers
Literary Awards
George Hodgman of New York City and Paris, Missouri, won the 2016 Friends of American Writers Literature Award for his memoir, Bettyville (Viking). He received $2,000. Andrew Malan Milward of Hattiesburg, Mississippi, and Judith Claire Mitchell of Madison, Wisconsin, won second-place prizes. Milward won for his story collection I Was A Revolutionary (HarperCollins) and Mitchell won for her novel A Reunion of Ghosts (HarperCollins). They each received $1,000. The annual awards are given to writers with strong Midwestern ties that have not published more than three books. The next deadline for nominations is December 1.
Friends of American Writers, Literary Awards, 474 Stagecoach Run, Glen Ellyn, IL 60137.
www.fawchicago.org/awards.php

The Frost Place
Chapbook Contest
Tiana Clark of Brentwood, Tennessee, won the 2016 Frost Place Chapbook Contest, sponsored by Bull City Press, for Equilibrium. She received a fellowship of approximately $1,550 to attend the annual Poetry Seminar at the Frost Place; a weeklong residency at Robert Frost's former home in Franconia, New Hampshire; a $250 stipend; and publication of her chapbook by Bull City Press. Afaa Michael Weaver judged. The annual award is given for a poetry chapbook. The next deadline is January 5, 2017.
Dartmouth Poet-in-Residence Award
Rose McLarney of Auburn, Alabama, won the 2016 Dartmouth Poet-in-Residence award. McLarney, whose most recent book is the poetry collection Its Day Being Gone (Penguin, 2014), received $2,000; a six- to eight-week residency at Robert Frost's former home in Franconia, New Hampshire; and an invitation to read at the Frost Place, Dartmouth College, and other local venues. The annual award is given to a poet who has published at least one poetry collection. The next deadline is January 5, 2017.
The Frost Place, P.O. Box 74, Franconia, NH 03580. (603) 823-5510.
frost@frostplace.org
www.frostplace.org

Glimmer Train Press
Fiction Open
David Mizner of New York City won the Fiction Open for “Your Swim.” He received $3,000. Ezekiel N. Finkelstein of New York City won the $1,000 second-place prize for “Clayton and the Apocalypse—scenes from an earlier life.” Both winning stories will be published in Issue 99 of Glimmer Train Stories. The editors judged. The award is twice yearly for a short story. (See Deadlines.)
Very Short Fiction Award
Anthony DeCasper of Chico, California, won the Very Short Fiction Award for "Redshift." He received $1,500, and his story will be published in Issue 99 of Glimmer Train Stories. The editors judged. The award is given twice yearly for a short short story. (See Deadlines.)
Glimmer Train Press, 4763 SW Maplewood Road, P.O. Box 80430, Portland, OR 97280. (503) 221-0836. Susan Burmeister-Brown and Linda Swanson-Davies, Coeditors.
www.glimmertrain.com

Great Lakes Colleges Association
New Writers Awards
Natalie Scenters-Zapico of Salt Lake City won the 2016 New Writers Award in poetry for her collection, The Verging Cities (Center for Literary Publishing, 2015). Lauren Acampora of Katonah, New York, won in fiction for her short story collection, The Wonder Garden (Grove Press, 2015). Shulem Deen of New York City won in creative nonfiction for his memoir, All Who Go Do Not Return (Graywolf Press, 2015). The winners will each receive travel expenses and an honorarium of $500 per visit to several of the Great Lakes Colleges Association's 13 member colleges, where they will give readings, meet with students, and lead classes. Christopher Bakken, Jennifer Clarvoe, and Pablo Peschiera judged in poetry; Joseph Aguilar, Mike Croley, and Mary Lacey judged in fiction; Peter Graham, Marin Heinritz, and Sylvia Watanabe judged in creative nonfiction. The annual awards are given for first published books of poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction. (See Deadlines.)
Great Lakes Colleges Association, New Writers Awards, 535 West William Street, Suite 301, Ann Arbor, MI 48103. Gregory Wegner, Director of Program Development.
wegner@glca.org
www.glca.org/program-menu/new-writers-award

Gulf Coast
Prize in Translation
Samantha Schnee of London won the 2015 Prize in Translation for her translation from the Spanish of an excerpt of Carmen Boullosa's novel The Romantics' Conspiracy. She received $1,000, and her translation will be published in the Summer/Fall 2016 issue of Gulf Coast. Ammiel Alcalay judged. The annual award is given for a work of translation from any language into English and alternates between poetry and prose. (See Deadlines.)
Gulf Coast, Prize in Translation, University of Houston, English Department, Houston, TX 77204. (713) 743-3223. Adrienne Perry, Editor.
editors@gulfcoastmag.org
www.gulfcoastmag.org

Hit & Run Press
William Dickey Memorial Broadside Contest
Jeff Encke of Seattle won the second annual William Dickey Memorial Broadside Contest for his poem "The Water in Which One Drowns Is Always an Ocean." He received $1,000, and his poem was published as a broadside by Hit & Run Press. Forrest Gander judged. The annual award is given for a poem. The next deadline is November 30.
Hit & Run Press, William Dickey Memorial Broadside Contest, 1569 Solano Avenue #379, Berkeley, CA 94707.
www.mrbebop.com/2nd-annual-william-dickey

Indiana Review
"1/2 K" Prize
Nghiem Tran of Poughkeepsie, New York, won the 2015 "1/2 K" Prize for his story "House." He received $1,000, and his story was published in Indiana Review. Kim Chinquee judged. The annual award is given for a poem or a piece of flash fiction or nonfiction. (See Deadlines.)
Indiana Review, “1/2 K” Prize, Indiana University, Ballantine Hall 529, 1020 East Kirkwood Avenue, Bloomington, IN 47405. Su Cho, Associate Editor.
indianareview.org   

John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation
Writing Fellowships
Twenty-seven writers received 2016 Guggenheim Fellowships in creative writing. The ten fellows in poetry are Beth Bachmann of Nashville; Rick Barot of Tacoma, Washington; Jericho Brown of Decatur, Georgia; Stephen Burt of Belmont, Massachusetts; Cynthia Huntington of Post Mills, Vermont; Sally Keith of Washington, D.C.; James Kimbrell of Tallahassee, Florida; Deborah Landau of New York City; Ed Roberson of Chicago; and Brian Turner of Orlando, Florida. In fiction, the eight fellows are Jesse Ball of Chicago; Jennifer Clement, Jess Row, and René Steinke, all of New York City; Amity Gaige of West Hartford, Connecticut; Laila Lalami of Santa Monica, California; Jenny Offill of Red Hook, New York; and Melanie Rae Thon of Salt Lake City. In creative nonfiction, the nine fellows are Adam Kirsch, Glenn Kurtz, Nick Laird, and Amanda Petrusich, all of New York City; Chris Kraus of Los Angeles; Amitava Kumar of Poughkeepsie, New York; Paul Lisicky of Philadelphia; Robert Storr of New Haven, Connecticut; and Sarah Payne Stuart of Nobleboro, Maine. The annual fellowships are approximately $50,000 each, and are awarded in recognition of “achievement and exceptional promise.” The next deadline is September 18.
John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation, Writing Fellowships, 90 Park Avenue, New York, NY 10016.
(212) 687-4470.
www.gf.org

Journal of Experimental Fiction
Kenneth Patchen Award
Charles Hood of Palmdale, California, won the 2016 Kenneth Patchen Award for his novel Mouth. He received $1,000, and his book will be published by Journal of Experimental Fiction/Depth Charge Publishing. Derek Pell judged. The annual award is given for an innovative novel. (See Deadlines.)
Journal of Experimental Fiction, Kenneth Patchen Award, 1110 Varsity Boulevard, Unit 221, DeKalb, IL 60115. Eckhard Gerdes, Contact.
egerdes@experimentalfiction.com
www.experimentalfiction.com/Kenneth_Patchen_Award.html

Langum Charitable Trust
Prize for American Historical Fiction
Faith Sullivan of Minneapolis won the 2015 David J. Langum Sr. Prize for American Historical Fiction for her novel Good Night, Mr. Wodehouse (Milkweed Editions). She received $1,000. The annual award is given for a work of fiction published in the previous year that "helps to make the rich history of America accessible to the general reader." The next deadline is December 1.
Langum Charitable Trust, Prize for American Historical Fiction, 2809 Berkeley Drive, Birmingham, AL 35242.
langumtrust@gmail.com
www.langumtrust.org/histlit.html

Library of Congress
Witter Bynner Fellowship
Poet Allison Hedge Coke of Guthrie, Oklahoma, won the 2016 Witter Bynner Fellowship. She received $10,000 and gave a reading at the Library of Congress and in her hometown. Poet laureate Juan Felipe Herrera judged. The annual award is given to a poet to support the writing of poetry. There is no application process.
Library of Congress, 101 Independence Avenue SE, Washington, D.C. 20540.
www.loc.gov/poetry

Literal Latté
Ames Essay Award
Laura Distelheim of Highland Park, Illinois, won the 2015 Ames Essay Award for “Requiem for All the Words That Didn’t Make It Into Tweets.” She received $1,000, and her essay was published in Literal Latté. The editors judged. The annual award is given for an essay. The next deadline is September 30.
Literal Latté, Ames Essay Award, 200 East 10th Street, Suite 240, New York, NY 10003. (212) 260-5532. Jenine Gordon Bockman, Editor.
litlatte@aol.com 

www.literal-latte.com

Lynx House Press
Blue Lynx Prize for Poetry
Dave Nielsen of Salt Lake City won the 2015 Blue Lynx Prize for Poetry for his collection Unfinished Figures. He received $2,000, and his book will be published by Lynx House Press. Kathleen Flenniken judged. The annual award is given for a poetry collection. The next deadline is May 15, 2017.
Lynx House Press, Blue Lynx Prize for Poetry, P.O. Box 940, Spokane, WA 99210. (509) 624-4894. Christopher Howell, Editor.
lynxhousepress@gmail.com
www.lynxhousepress.org

Measure Press
Howard Nemerov Sonnet Award
D. R. Goodman of Oakland, California, won the 2015 Howard Nemerov Sonnet Award for "All the Dropped Things." She received $1,000 and publication of her poem in Measure: A Review of Formal Poetry. Gail White judged. The annual award is given for a sonnet. The next deadline is November 15.
Measure Press, Howard Nemerov Sonnet Award, 21 Osborn Terrace, Wayne, NY 07470.
www.measurepress.com

Michigan Quarterly Review
Literary Prizes
Alyson Hagy of Laramie, Wyoming, won the 38th annual Lawrence Foundation Prize for her story "Switchback," which appeared in the Spring 2015 issue of Michigan Quarterly Review. She received $1,000. The journal's editorial board judged. Raymond McDaniel of Ann Arbor, Michigan, won the 14th annual Laurence Goldstein Poetry Prize for his poem "Claire Lenoir," which appeared in the Fall 2015 issue of Michigan Quarterly Review. He received $500. Paisley Rekdal judged. The annual awards are given for a short story and a poem published in Michigan Quarterly Review during the previous year. There is no application process.
Page Davidson Clayton Prize
Katie Hartsock of Chicago won the seventh annual Page Davidson Clayton Prize for Emerging Poets for her poem "The Sister Karamazov," which appeared in the Spring 2015 issue of Michigan Quarterly Review. She received $500. The editors judged. The annual award is given for a poem or group of poems published in Michigan Quarterly Review by a poet who has not published a book at the time of publication in the journal. There is no application process.
Michigan Quarterly Review, 0576 Rackham Building, 915 East Washington Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109. (734) 764-9265. Vicki Lawrence, Managing Editor.
www.michiganquarterlyreview.com

Missouri Review
Jeffrey E. Smith Editors' Prizes
Three writers won 2015 Jeffrey E. Smith Editors’ Prizes. Phillip B. Williams of Chicago won in poetry for a group of poems; Emma Törzs of Minneapolis won in fiction for her story “The Wall;” and Genese Grill of Burlington, Vermont, won in creative nonfiction for her essay “Portals: Cabinets of Curiosity, Reliquaries, and Colonialism.” They each received $5,000 and publication in Missouri Review. The annual awards are given for a group of poems, a story, and an essay. The next deadline is October 1.
Missouri Review, Jeffrey E. Smith Editors’ Prizes, University of Missouri, 357 McReynolds Hall, Columbia, MO 65211. (573) 882-4474.
contest_question@moreview.com
www.missourireview.com

National Book Critics Circle
Book Awards
Ross Gay of Bloomington, Indiana, received the National Book Critics Circle Award for 2015 in poetry for his collection Catalog of Unabashed Gratitude (University of Pittsburgh Press). The finalists were Terrance Hayes of Pittsburgh for How to Be Drawn (Penguin); Ada Limón of Lexington, Kentucky, and Sonoma, California, for Bright Dead Things (Milkweed Editions); Sinéad Morrissey of Belfast for Parallax and Selected Poems (Farrar, Straus and Giroux); and the late Frank Stanford for What About This: Collected Poems of Frank Stanford (Copper Canyon Press). Paul Beatty of New York City received the fiction award for his novel The Sellout (Farrar, Straus and Giroux). The finalists were Lauren Groff of Gainesville, Florida, for her novel Fates & Furies (Riverhead Books); Valeria Luiselli of New York City for her novel The Story of My Teeth (Coffee House Press); Anthony Marra of Oakland, California, for his story collection, The Tsar of Love and Techno (Hogarth); and Ottessa Moshfegh of Oakland, California, for her novel, Eileen (Penguin Press). Margo Jefferson of New York City received the autobiography award for her memoir, Negroland (Pantheon). The finalists were Elizabeth Alexander of New York City for The Light of the World (Grand Central Publishing); Vivian Gornick of New York City for The Odd Woman and the City (Farrar, Straus and Giroux); George Hodgman of New York City and Paris, Missouri, for Bettyville (Viking); and Helen Macdonald of Cambridge, England, for H Is for Hawk (Grove Press). Sam Quinones of Los Angeles received the nonfiction award for his book Dreamland: The True Story of America’s Opiate Epidemic (Bloomsbury). The finalists were Mary Beard of Cambridge, England, for SPQR: A History of Rome (Liveright); Ari Berman of New York City for Give Us the Ballot: The Modern Struggle for Voting Rights in America (Farrar, Straus and Giroux); Jill Leovy of Los Angeles for Ghettoside: A True Story of Murder in America (Spiegel & Grau); and Brian Seibert of New York City for What the Eye Hears: A History of Tap Dancing (Farrar, Straus and Giroux). Maggie Nelson of Los Angeles received the criticism award for her book The Argonauts (Graywolf Press). The finalists were Ta-Nehisi Coates of Paris for Between the World and Me (Spiegel & Grau); Leo Damrosch of Newton, Massachusetts, for Eternity’s Sunrise: The Imaginative World of William Blake (Yale University Press); Colm Tóibín of Dublin for On Elizabeth Bishop (Princeton University Press); and James Wood of Cambridge, Massachusetts, for The Nearest Thing to Life (Brandeis University Press). The National Book Critics Circle, a professional organization composed of 700 book critics and reviewers from across the country, annually honors books of poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction published in the previous year. The next deadline is December 1.
John Leonard Prize
Kirstin Valdez Quade of Ann Arbor, Michigan, won the John Leonard Award for her short story collection, Night at the Fiestas (W. W. Norton). The annual award is given for a first book in any genre. There is no application process.
National Book Critics Circle, 160 Varick Street, 11th Floor, New York, NY 10013.
info@bookcritics.org
bookcritics.org

North Carolina Writers' Network
Rose Post Creative Nonfiction Competition
Karen Smith Linehan of Carolina Beach, North Carolina, won the 2016 Rose Post Creative Nonfiction Competition for her essay "Magnolia grandiflora." She received $1,000, and possible publication of her essay in Ecotone. Kate Sweeney judged. The annual award is given for an essay that "is outside the realm of conventional journalism and has relevance to North Carolinians." The next deadline is January 15, 2017.
Thomas Wolfe Fiction Prize
Alli Marshall of Asheville, North Carolina, won the 2016 Thomas Wolfe Fiction Prize for her short story "Catching Out." She received $1,000, and her story will be published in Thomas Wolfe Review. Ron Rash judged. The annual award is given for a short story. The next deadline is January 30, 2017.
North Carolina Writers' Network, P.O. Box 21591, Winston-Salem, NC 27120. Ed Southern, Contact.
ed@ncwriters.org
www.ncwriters.org

Off the Grid Press
Poetry Prize
Patricia Corbus of Sarasota, Florida, won the 2015 Off the Grid Press Poetry Prize for her collection Finestra's Window. She received $1,000, and her book was published by Off the Grid Press. The annual award is given for a poetry collection by a poet over the age of 60. As of this writing, the next deadline has not been set.
Off the Grid Press, Poetry Prize, 24 Quincy Street, Somerville, MA 02143. Tam Lin Neville, Coeditor.
offthegridpress@gmail.com
offthegridpress.net

Orison Books
Poetry and Fiction Prizes
Rebecca Aronson of Albuquerque, New Mexico, won the 2016 Orison Poetry Prize for her collection Ghost Child of the Atalanta Bloom. David Ebenbach of Washington D.C. won the 2016 Orison Fiction Prize for his novel Miss Portland. They each received $1,500, and their books will be published by Orison Books in 2017. Hadara Bar-Nadav judged in poetry; Peter Orner judged in fiction. The annual awards are given for a poetry collection and a story collection or novel. The next deadline is April 1, 2017.
Orison Books, Poetry and Fiction Prizes, P.O. Box 8385, Asheville, NC 28814. Luke Hankins, Editor.
www.orisonbooks.com

PEN Center USA
Emerging Voices Fellowships
Five writers received 2016 Emerging Voices Fellowships from PEN Center USA. They are poet Wendy Labinger, fiction writers Natalie Lima and Chelsea Sutton, and nonfiction writers Marnie Goodfriend and Jian Huang, all of Los Angeles. They each received $1,000, and will participate in a mentorship program with a professional writer, as well as public readings and other programming in Los Angeles. The annual awards are given to emerging poets, fiction writers, and creative nonfiction writers. (See Deadlines.)
PEN Center USA, Emerging Voices Fellowships, P.O. Box 6037, Beverly Hills, CA 90212. (323) 424-4939.
pen@penusa.org
www.penusa.org/programs/emerging-voices

PEN/Faulkner Foundation
Award for Fiction
James Hannaham of New York City won the 2016 PEN/Faulkner Award for his novel Delicious Foods (Little, Brown). He received $15,000. The finalists were Julie Iromuanya of Tucson, Arizona, for her novel, Mr. and Mrs. Doctor (Coffee House Press); Viet Thanh Nguyen of Los Angeles for his novel, The Sympathizer (Grove Press); Elizabeth Tallent of Mendocino, California, for her story collection Mendocino Fire (HarperCollins); and Luis Alberto Urrea of Naperville, Illinois, for his story collection The Water Museum (Little, Brown). They each received $5,000. Abby Frucht, Molly McCloskey, and Sergio Troncoso judged. The annual award is given for a work of fiction by a U.S. writer published in the previous year. As of this writing, the next deadline has not been set.
PEN/Faulkner Foundation, Award for Fiction, 201 East Capitol Street SE, Washington, D.C. 20003. (202) 898-9063.
awards@penfaulkner.org
www.penfaulkner.org/award-for-fiction

Persea Books
Lexi Rudnitsky First Book Prize in Poetry
Molly McCully Brown of Oxford, Mississippi, won the 2016 Lexi Rudnitsky First Book Prize in Poetry for her debut collection, The Virginia State Colony for Epileptics and Feebleminded. She received $1,000, and her book will be published in 2017 by Persea Books. She also received an all-expenses-paid residency at the Civitella Ranieri Center, an artists retreat in Umbria, Italy. The annual award is given for a poetry collection by a woman who has not yet published a book. The next deadline is October 31.
Persea Books, Lexi Rudnitsky First Book Prize in Poetry, 277 Broadway, Suite 708, New York, NY 10007. (212) 260-9256. Gabriel Fried, Poetry Editor.
info@perseabooks.com
www.perseabooks.com

Perugia Press
Perugia Press Prize
Lisa Allen Ortiz of Santa Cruz, California, won the 2016 Perugia Press Prize for her poetry collection, Guide to the Exhibit. She received $1,000, and her book will be published by Perugia Press in September. The annual award is given for a first or second book of poetry by a woman. The next deadline is November 15.
Perugia Press, Perugia Press Prize, P.O. Box 60364, Florence, MA 01062. Susan Kan, Director. 

www.perugiapress.com

phren-Z
Morton Marcus Poetry Contest
Alexandra Barylski of Palo Alto, California, won the 2015 Morton Marcus Poetry Contest for her poem "A Letter." She received $1,000, publication of her poem in phren-Z, and an invitation to read at the sixth annual Morton Marcus Poetry Reading at the University of California in Santa Cruz. Stephen Kessler judged. The annual award is given for a poem. (See Deadlines.)
phren-Z, Morton Marcus Poetry Contest, 184 Kenny Court, Santa Cruz, CA 95065. Jory Post, Cofounder.
jory@cruzio.com
phren-z.org

Ploughshares
Alice Hoffman Prize for Fiction
Ramona Ausubel of Berkeley, California, won the 2015 Alice Hoffman Prize for Fiction for her short story "Fresh Water From the Sea," which was published in the Summer 2015 issue of Ploughshares. She received $1,000. Alice Hoffman judged. The annual award is given to the best piece of fiction published in the journal during the previous year. There is no application process.
Ploughshares, 120 Boylston Street, Boston, MA 02116. (617) 824-3757. Ellen Duffer, Managing Editor.
pshares@pshares.org
www.pshares.org

Poetry Society of America
Frost Medal
Grace Schulman of New York City and East Hampton, New York, won the 2016 Frost Medal. Schulman, whose most recent poetry collection is Without a Claim (Mariner Books, 2013), received $5,000. The annual award is given by the Poetry Society of America Board of Governors to recognize "distinguished lifetime achievement in American poetry." There is no application process.
Robert H. Winner Memorial Award
Erin Redfern of San Jose, California, and Metta Sáma of Winston-Salem, North Carolina, both won the 2016 Robert H. Winner Memorial Award. They each received $1,250 and publication of a poem on the Poetry Society of America website. Cyrus Cassells judged. The annual award is given to a poet over 40 who has published no more than one book. The next deadline is December 22.
Poetry Society of America, 15 Gramercy Park South, New York, NY 10003. (212) 254-9628. Brett Fletcher Lauer, Deputy Director.
brett@poetrysociety.org
www.poetrysociety.org

Poets & Writers, Inc.
Jackson Poetry Prize
Will Alexander of Los Angeles won the tenth annual Jackson Poetry Prize. Alexander, whose most recent book is Singing in Magnetic Hoofbeat: Essays, Prose Texts, Interviews and a Lecture 1991–2007 (Essay Press, 2012), received $50,000. Elizabeth Alexander, Rae Armantrout, and Terrance Hayes judged. The annual award is given to “an American poet of exceptional talent who deserves wider recognition.” There is no application process.
Maureen Egen Writers Exchange Awards
Poet Kimo Armitage of Honolulu and fiction writer Alicia Upano of Wahiawa, Hawai'i, won the 2016 Maureen Egen Writers Exchange Awards. They each received $500, a monthlong residency at the Jentel Artist Residency Program in Wyoming, and an all-expenses-paid trip to New York City to meet with writers, agents, editors, and publishers. Sarah Gambito judged in poetry; Alexander Chee judged in fiction. The annual awards are given to a poet and a fiction writer from a select state. As of this writing, the next deadline has not been set.
Poets & Writers, Inc., 90 Broad Street, Suite 2100, New York, NY 10004. (212) 226-3586.
www.pw.org

Pulitzer Prizes
Prizes in Letters
Peter Balakian of Hamilton, New York, won the 2016 Pulitzer Prize in poetry for Ozone Journal (University of Chicago Press). The finalists were Elizabeth Willis of Middletown, Connecticut, for Alive: New and Selected Poems (New York Review Books) and Diane Seuss of Kalamazoo, Michigan, for Four-Legged Girl (Graywolf Press). Rafael Campo, Al Filreis, and Nikky Finney judged. Viet Thanh Nguyen of Los Angeles won the prize in fiction for his novel, The Sympathizer (Grove Press). The finalists were Kelly Link of Northampton, Massachusetts, for her story collection Get in Trouble (Random House); and Margaret Verble of Lexington, Kentucky, and Old Windsor, England, for her novel, Maud's Line (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt). Edward P. Jones, Leah Price, and Art Winslow judged. William Finnegan of New York City won the prize in autobiography/biography for his memoir, Barbarian Days: A Surfing Life (Penguin Press). The finalists were T. J. Stiles of Berkeley, California, for his biography Custer's Trials: A Life on the Frontier of a New America (Knopf) and Elizabeth Alexander of New York City for her memoir, The Light of the World (Grand Central Publishing). Annette Gordon-Reed, Michael Kazin, and Linda Leavell judged. Joby Warrick of Washington D.C. won the prize in nonfiction for Black Flags: The Rise of ISIS (Doubleday). The finalists were Ta-Nehisi Coates of Paris for Between the World and Me (Spiegel & Grau) and Carla Power of Brighton, England, for If the Oceans Were Ink: An Unlikely Friendship and a Journey to the Heart of the Quran (Henry Holt). Douglas A. Blackmon, Susan Faludi, and Louise Kiernan judged. The winners each received $10,000. The annual awards honor books by U.S. writers published in the United States during the previous year. The annual deadlines are June 15 and October 1.
Pulitzer Prizes, Prizes in Letters, Columbia University, 709 Pulitzer Hall, 2950 Broadway, New York, NY 10027. (212) 854-3841.
pulitzer@pulitzer.org
www.pulitzer.org

Rattle
Poetry Prize
Valentina Gnup of Oakland, California, won the 2015 Rattle Poetry Prize Readers' Choice Award for "Morning at the Welfare Office." She received $2,000, and her poem was published in Issue 50 of Rattle. The editors selected finalists, and Rattle subscribers selected the winner. The annual award is given for a poem. The next deadline is July 15.
Neil Postman Award for Metaphor
Jack Vian of Beaumont, Texas, won the 2016 Neil Postman Award for Metaphor for his poem "Musashi-san." He received $1,000, and his poem was published in Issue 47 of Rattle. The editors judged. The annual award is given for a poem "exhibiting the best use of metaphor" among submissions to Rattle received during the previous year. There is no application process.
Rattle, 12411 Ventura Boulevard, Studio City, CA 91604. (818) 505-6777. Timothy Green, Editor.
tim@rattle.com
www.rattle.com

River Styx
Schlafly Beer Micro-Brew Micro-Fiction Contest
Justin Herrmann of Kotzebue, Alaska, won the 2016 River Styx Schlafly Beer Micro-Brew Micro-Fiction Contest for his short story "Sundowning." He received $1,500, a case of Schlafly beer, and publication of his story in River Styx. The annual award is given for a work of micro-fiction under 500 words. The next deadline is December 31.
River Styx, Schlafly Beer Micro-Brew Micro-Fiction Contest, 3139A South Grand Boulevard, Suite 203, Saint Louis, MO 63118. Richard Newman, Editor.
bigriver@riverstyx.org
www.riverstyx.org

Seattle Review
Chapbook Contest
Adrienne Raphel of Cambridge, Massachusetts, won the 2015 Chapbook Contest for But What Will We Do. She received $1,000, and her chapbook was published by Seattle Review. Robyn Schiff judged. The annual award is given for a chapbook. (See Deadlines.)
Seattle Review, Chapbook Contest, P.O. Box 354330, Seattle, WA 98195.
seattlereview@gmail.com
www.theseattlereview.org/new-page

Snake Nation Press
Violet Reed Haas Prize for Poetry
John Paul O'Connor of Franklin, New York, won the 2015 Violet Reed Haas Prize for Poetry for his collection, Half the Truth. He received $1,000 and publication of his book by Snake Nation Press. The annual award is given for a poetry collection. (See Deadlines.)
Serena Kennedy Fiction Award
Misty Urban of Muscatine, Iowa, won the 2015 Serena Kennedy Fiction Award for her short story collection, A Lesson in Manners. She received $1,000 and publication of her book by Snake Nation Press. The annual award is given for a novella or short story collection. (See Deadlines.)
Snake Nation Press, 110 West Force Street, Valdosta, GA 31601. Roberta George, Founding Editor.
snake.nation.press@gmail.com
www.snakenationpress.org

Southwest Review
Morton Marr Poetry Prize
Terry Eicher of New Haven, Connecticut, won the 2015 Morton Marr Poetry Prize for his poem "Her Right Breast's Complaint." He received $1,000, and his poem was published in Volume 101, Number 1, of Southwest Review. David Lehman judged. The annual award is given for a poem or group of poems written in traditional verse by a writer who has not published a book of poetry. The next deadline is September 30.
Southwest Review, Morton Marr Poetry Prize, Southern Methodist University, P.O. Box 750374, 3225 Daniel Avenue, Heroy Science Hall, Room G09, Dallas, TX 75275. (214) 768-1037. Jennifer Cranfill, Senior Editor.
www.smu.edu/southwestreview

The Story Prize
Adam Johnson of San Francisco won the 2015 Story Prize for Fortune Smiles (Random House). He received $20,000. The finalists were Charles Baxter of Minneapolis for There's Something I Want You to Do (Pantheon Books) and Colum McCann of New York City for Thirteen Ways of Looking (Random House). They each received $5,000. Anthony Doerr, Rita Meade, and Kathryn Schulz judged. Adrian Tomine of New York City won the 2015 Story Prize Spotlight Award for Killing and Dying (Drawn & Quarterly). He received $1,000. Larry Dark and Julie Lindsey judged. The annual awards are given for short story collections published during the previous year. (See Deadlines.)
The Story Prize, 41 Watchung Plaza, #384, Montclair, NJ 07042. Larry Dark, Director.
info@thestoryprize.org
www.thestoryprize.org

Two Sylvias Press
Wilder Series Poetry Book Prize
Carmen Gillespie of Lewisburg, Pennsylvania, won the 2016 Wilder Series Poetry Book Prize for her collection The Blue Black Wet of Wood. She received $1,000, and her book will be published in the fall. Kelli Russell Agodon and Annette Spaulding-Convy judged. The annual award is given for a poetry collection by a woman over the age of 50. The next deadline is November 30.
Two Sylvias Press, Wilder Series Poetry Book Prize, P.O. Box 1524, Kingston, WA 98346.
twosylviaspress@gmail.com
twosylviaspress.com/wilder-series-poetry-book-prize.html

Unterberg Poetry Center
"Discovery"/Boston Review Poetry Prizes
Four poets won 2016 "Discovery"/Boston Review Poetry Prizes. They are Ryan Fox, Carlie Hoffman, Gala Mukomolova, and Miller Oberman, all of New York City. They each received $500, publication of their work in Boston Review, and an invitation to give a reading at the 92nd Street Y in New York City. Timothy Donnelly, Thylias Moss, Paul Muldoon, Solmaz Sharif, and Ellen Bryant Voigt judged. The annual awards are given to four poets who have not published a book of poems. The next deadline is January 20, 2017.
Unterberg Poetry Center, "Discovery"/Boston Review Poetry Prizes, 1395 Lexington Avenue, New York, NY 10128. (212) 415-5760. Ricardo Maldonado, Contact.
rickymaldonado@92y.org
www.92y.org/discovery

Zócalo Public Square
Book Prize
Sherry Turkle of Boston won the sixth annual Zócalo Public Square Book Prize for Reclaiming Conversation: The Power of Talk in a Digital Age (Penguin). She received $5,000 and an invitation to give a lecture at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles in May. The annual award is given for a nonfiction book published in the United States in the previous year that “best enhances our understanding of community, social cohesion, and human connectedness.” As of this writing, the next deadline has not been set.
Poetry Prize
Matt Phillips of San Diego won the fifth annual Zócalo Poetry Prize for “Crossing Coronado Bridge.” He received $500, and his poem was published on the Zócalo Public Square website. Colette LaBouff Atkinson and the Zócalo editors judged. The annual award is given for a poem that “best explores people’s connection to place.” As of this writing, the next deadline has not been set.
Zócalo Public Square, 725 Arizona Avenue, Santa Monica, CA 90401. (424) 229-9493. Jia-Rui Cook, Editor.
jiarui@zocalopublicsquare.org
zocalopublicsquare.org