Sarah Bruni

Sarah Bruni Recommends...

Writers Recommend

Posted 6.19.13

“I read aloud. This can make writing anywhere besides at home nearly impossible. I envy those who write in cafés, but each time I try it myself, I only eavesdrop. Reading aloud, I become more emotionally invested in the moment I’m trying to create; I feel present in the dialogue, so I’m more likely to hear the response to something a character has said, rather than force it. I read aloud slowly and deliberately. If I have a particularly productive morning writing, I’ll often have a slightly sore throat in the afternoon from all that talking to myself. When hearing fragments from something I’m working on doesn’t help guide me, I read aloud the work of writers I admire—Raymond Carver, Lorrie Moore, Italo Calvino, George Saunders, Roberto Bolaño, Joan Didion—writers whose language offers a kind of borrowed rhythm to embrace and articulate for a while. And when that doesn’t work, I go for a walk, a run, a bike ride—some outside activity, preferably in the sun and surrounded by the movement of other people, and I try again the next day.”
—Sarah Bruni, author of The Night Gwen Stacy Died (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2013)

Comments

Touchstone says...

It was so nice to read that someone else reads out loud too!  I always loved reading stories out loud to my children, but I feel more connected to my own writing when I hear it being read.  There are many times if I have to call someone, I write what I want to make sure to say, then read it out loud over the phone.  Several times the person compliments how wonderfully I can express my thoughts and feelings so spontaneouly! . Ah if they only knew!   Thank you for your recomendation.  Now I know there is hope!

PoeticNimbus says...

I live in a place full of people and sometimes they run in and out of the house and lately I have given up on reading aloud. I shouldn't because that is probably the most purest and objective way to hear your own words come to life and I thank you for the advice which works for you. I need to maybe read aloud in other places...outside? Not sure.

Thanks!

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