Items Tagged With habits

Why We Write: San Francisco 2015

Posted 4.30.15

Melissa Faliveno, associate editor of Poets & Writers Magazine, leads a conversation with authors Wendy Lesser, Yiyun Li, Alejandro Murguia, D. A. Powell, and Michelle Tea about the personal, political, and professional reasons we choose to write while living in a culture, a family, or a community that doesn’t always value what we do.

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Rethinking Rejection: Notes from the Slush Pile

by Reagan Upshaw

The Literary Life

Posted 4.15.15

Reagan Upshaw

The assistant poetry editor of Able Muse offers his thoughts on coming to terms with the inevitability—and impersonality—of rejection in the world of literary magazines.

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Feckless Pondering: Emotional Beats and the Art of Repose

by Benjamin Percy

The Literary Life

Posted 12.16.14

Benjamin Percy

A case for balancing action with introspection in fiction, in order to avoid “gumming up the gears of your story.”

 

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USB Typewriters

Posted 12.16.14

Since 2010, engineer and designer Jack Zylkin has renovated typewriters for the digital age, transforming them into more versatile, practical writing tools. Plugged into a computer, tablet, or smartphone, Zylkin’s USB Typewriters function like modern external keyboards, combining the physical writing experience of the manual typewriter with the ease of modern word processing. Zylkin sells ready-made USB Typewriters, as well as do-it-yourself conversion kits customized for a range of models. The following images highlight Zylkin’s process.

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  • 1 of 91. Materials Needed

    1. Materials Needed

    A USB Typewriter conversion kit includes (clockwise from top left) a roll of cloth tape, an assortment of magnets, four magnetic switches, a sensor panel, and a control panel. A user can install the kit with a few basic tools: a screwdriver, a pair of pliers, a hot glue gun, wire strippers, and a metal file.

  • 2 of 92. Attaching the Sensor Circuitry

    2. Attaching the Sensor Circuitry

    Zylkin’s first step in creating USB Typewriters is to attach the sensor circuitry under the keys of the typewriter. The sensor panel, which is either soldered or glued to the machine, detects which key is pressed.

  • 3 of 93. Zylkin at Work

    3. Zylkin at Work

    Zylkin attaches a sensor panel to an Underwood typewriter.

  • 4 of 94. Zylkin at Work

    4. Zylkin at Work

    Zylkin solders the sensor panel to an Underwood typewriter.

  • 5 of 95. Attaching the Control Panel

    5. Attaching the Control Panel

    After the sensor circuitry is attached, Zylkin mounts the control panel to the side of a typewriter. The control panel—which includes CTRL, ALT, and CMD buttons—connects the typewriter’s sensor circuitry to a computer, tablet, or smartphone.

  • 6 of 96. Magnetic Switches

    6. Magnetic Switches

    Magnetic switches detect the motion of magnets Zylkin glues to the typewriter’s spacebar, shift key, and backspace key.

  • 7 of 97. Metal Stand

    7. Metal Stand

    Zylkin uses a strip of brass or steel to create a stand for a tablet. USB Typewriters are compatible with all computers and many tablets and smartphones.

  • 8 of 98. Olivetti USB Typewriter

    8. Olivetti USB Typewriter

    Zylkin has created USB Typewriters out of a variety of machines including Underwoods, Olympias, Remingtons, and this red Olivetti Valentine.

  • 9 of 99. Underwood USB Typewriter

    9. Underwood USB Typewriter

    An Underwood typewriter converted into a USB Typewriter.

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