Boxcar Poetry Review

Boxcar Poetry Review

Posted 12.16.13

Founded in 2005 by Neil Aitken, Boxcar Poetry Review is a quarterly online journal featuring the work of emerging and established poets as well as book reviews and interviews. The publication is especially committed to promoting the next generation of poets and their work, and therefore encourages publishers, presses, and poets to submit first books (no chapbooks) for review. Recently reviewed books include The Organ Builder by Austin MacRae, Voices Through Skin by Theresa Senato Edwards, and Gust by Greg Alan Brownderville.

Genres Reviewed: 
Poetry
Formats: 
Online
Charges Fee: 
No
Reviews Self-Published: 
No
Review Editor
Boxcar Poetry Review
310 Arballo Dr. Apt. 11G
City: 
San Francisco,
State: 
California
Zip / Postal Code: 
94132

Current Issue

Cover Story 

Our Independent Publishing Issue features an in-depth interview with Graywolf Press editor Jeff Shotts; a look at the successful partnerships of eleven small-press authors and their editors; a profile of indie essayist Charles D'Ambrosio; Donald Hall recalls a golden age of American poetry; best-selling author Miranda Beverly-Whittemore on the rewards of self-promotion; advice for self-published authors; a conversation with Guernica publisher Lisa Lucas; and much more.

Let's Just Do This: Eleven Small-Press Authors and their Publishing Partners

by Kevin Larimer

Special Section

Posted 10.15.14

November/December 2014

Eleven small-press authors and their publishing partners discuss the independent approach—and all the passion, commitment, and love that comes with it—to bringing books into the world.

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Agents & Editors: Jeff Shotts

by Michael Szczerban

Special Section

Posted 10.15.14

November/December 2014

Graywolf Press executive editor Jeff Shotts discusses the power of patience in publishing, editing as an act of empathy, and why it’s an exciting time to be a poet.

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Finding Gems in Lost & Found

by Rebecca Bates

News and Trends

Posted 10.15.14

November/December 2014

The Center for Humanities at the CUNY Graduate Center in New York City is making the ephemeral more tangible through its Lost & Found chapbook series.

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