Five American Writers Among Booker Prize Semifinalists

Read more from G&A: The Contest Blog

Posted 7.29.15 by Prize Reporter

The longlist for the 2015 Man Booker Prize for Fiction was announced this morning. The annual prize of £50,000 (approximately $78,142) honors the best book of fiction written in English and published in United Kingdom during the previous year. This year, the list of thirteen semifinalists includes five writers from the United States: Bill Clegg, Laila Lalami, Marilynne Robinson, Anne Tyler, and Hanya Yanagihara. Writers from Britain, Ireland, New Zealand, India, Nigeria, and Jamaica complete the list.

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University of Akron Press Closes, an Elizabeth Gilbert–Inspired Anthology, and More

by Staff

Daily News

Online Only, posted 7.29.15

Hackers use Jane Austen to trick antivirus software; 2015 Man Booker longlist announced; how Lydia Davis’s short stories recreate social media’s effects; and other news.

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Arthur Sze on Translation

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Posted 7.29.15

"For me, translation is, in a way, the most intimate form of reading, the most concentrated form, and it's also vital to my process of creation." At the Academy of American Poets' 2014 Poets Forum, Arthur Sze speaks about how translation has influenced his work as a poet and reads from two Chinese poets—one classical and one contemporary.

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Conflicting Evidence

Fiction Prompt

Read more from The Time Is Now

Posted 7.29.15 by Writing Prompter

Penelope Lively says, "History is in fact not so much memory as it is an examination of conflicting evidences. And this is the same for a fictional purpose: in any scene there can be as many accounts of a scene as there were people present." This week, write two separate accounts of a scene in which a crime is unfolding, witnessed by two people who are standing side by side looking out the same window. How might two individuals be compelled to notice different details? What might this reveal about their personalities and emotional states?

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Ursula Le Guin Launches Online Craft Workshop, New Transgender Poetry Course, and More

by Staff

Daily News

Online Only, posted 7.28.15

The language of grief; David Foster Wallace’s entertainment anxiety; an interview with the late E. L. Doctorow; and other news.

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My Day Is Over

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Posted 7.28.15

This poem by Frank Stanford is featured in Hidden Water: From the Frank Stanford Archives, published by Third Man Books this month. The book is a collection of unpublished poems, drafts, photos, and correspondence between Stanford and fellow American poets Allen Ginsberg and Alan Dugan.

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Dog Days

Poetry Prompt

Read more from The Time Is Now

Posted 7.28.15 by Writing Prompter

The "dog days" of summer typically refer to the hottest days around July and August. The term originates with the ancient Romans who associated this time of year with the brightest star Sirius—also known as the Dog Star—rising and setting in sync with the sun, supposedly making the days hotter. Explore other natural occurrences that coincide with summer—fire rainbows, foxfire, midnight sun—and write a poem in tribute to the hottest days of the year.

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Where Cast Iron Potatoes Meet Poetry: Seattle's Unconventional APRIL Literary Festival

Read more from Readings & Workshops Blog

Posted 7.27.15 by RW Blogger

Authors, Publishers and Readers of Independent Literature (APRIL) is a Seattle-based literary nonprofit working to connect readers with independent literature, authors, and publishers. APRIL hosts a regular book club, bookstore bike tours, and an annual festival during one week in March. Frances Chiem, deputy director of APRIL, blogs about two events from this year’s festival which were supported in part by Poets & Writers.

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Copper Canyon to Publish Lost Neruda Poems, In Defense of Unlinked Story Collections, and More

by Staff

Daily News

Online Only, posted 7.27.15

Percival Everett interviewed at Virginia Quarterly Review; Roxane Gay on the death of Sandra Bland; retracing Ralph Waldo Emerson’s journey through the Adirondacks; and other news.

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J. Ryan Stradal

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Posted 7.27.15

"To me, books came from another planet. I didn't know anyone who wrote them." J. Ryan Stradal recounts seeing an author read for the first time, and discusses the regional food and family relationships that informed his debut novel, Kitchens of the Great Midwest, released this week by Pamela Dorman Books.​

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