Magazine Articles Tagged With chapbooks

Finding Gems in Lost & Found

by Rebecca Bates

News and Trends

Posted 10.15.14

November/December 2014

The Center for Humanities at the CUNY Graduate Center in New York City is making the ephemeral more tangible through its Lost & Found chapbook series.

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National Poetry Month, Poets on Twitter, and More

by Staff

Daily News

Online Only, posted 4.1.14

New York City’s Rare Book Week; the exploitation of Detroit’s decay; writers reflect on the portrayal of Appalachia; and other news.

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Jack Handy Tackles Humor and Hawaii, Backwards Poetry, Roger Ebert’s London, and More

by James F. Thompson

Daily News

Online Only, posted 7.12.13

Deep Thoughts humorist pens novel about Hawaii; the art of reading poetry backwards; Roger Ebert lives on in London; the pitfalls of marrying a writer; and other news.

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DIY: How to Make and Bind Chapbooks

by Staff

Online Exclusive

Online Only, posted 1.31.13

Whether you end up distributing your own prose or poetry at a reading or collecting the work of your friends in limited editions, these instructions on how to create and bind your own chapbooks offer hours of bookmaking fun.

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Goodbye to Algonquin's Oak Room, E. B. White Answers the ASPCA, and More

by Evan Smith Rakoff

Daily News

Online Only, posted 2.3.12

Melville House wonders when publishers will speak out about Amazon; New York City's Algonquin Hotel announced that when it reopens this spring after a renovation, the famed Oak Room will be gone; E. B. White answers a charge levied by the ASPCA; and more

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Remembering Wislawa Szymborska and Dorothea Tanning, Paul Auster's War of Words, and More

by Evan Smith Rakoff

Daily News

Online Only, posted 2.2.12

Nobel prize-winning poet Wislawa Szymborska, as well as Surrealist artist and poet Dorothea Tanning, passed away yesterday in their respective countries; novelist Paul Auster has engaged in a war of words with Tayyip Erdogan, the prime minister of Turkey; Open Letters Monthly examines the hidden life of Virginia Woolf's institutionalized half-sister, Laura Makepeace Stephen; and other news.

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DIY: How to Coptic Bind a Chapbook

Posted 11.1.10

coptic.jpg

As a companion to Indie Innovators, a special section on groundbreaking presses and magazines, we demonstrate how to Coptic bind a chapbook. View the accompanying slideshow for information on formatting your book in Microsoft Word.

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DIY: How to Coptic Bind a Chapbook

Posted 10.20.10

A companion to Indie Innovators, a special section on groundbreaking presses and magazines. Don't miss our video demonstration of how to Coptic bind a chapbook.

  • 1 of 17Figure A
    Credit: Illustrations by Emily Cooper

    Figure A

    1. Choose your covers—postcards (sets of two glued back to back), old book covers, heavy card stock—and punch holes with an awl (purchased at hardware stores for about eight dollars) about a quarter inch from the left edge: one near the top, one near the bottom, and about three in between; they need not be equidistant (fig. A).

  • 2 of 17Figure B
    Credit: Illustrations by Emily Cooper

    Figure B

    2. To format your book in Microsoft Word for standard postcard size, open a New Blank Document (under the File menu).  Go to File > Page Setup and choose the landscape orientation; click OK (fig. B).

    3. Create thirty-six pages by inserting page breaks (Insert > Break > Page Break).

  • 3 of 17Figure C
    Credit: Illustrations by Emily Cooper

    Figure C

    4. Go to Insert > Page Numbers… and select Top of page (Header) and Right alignment (fig. C). (These page numbers will be trimmed off later, but will be useful for printing out your pages.)

  • 4 of 17Figure D
    Credit: Illustrations by Emily Cooper

    Figure D

    5. Open the Drawing toolbar (View > Toolbars > Drawing) as shown in figure D.

  • 5 of 17Figure E
    Credit: Illustrations by Emily Cooper

    Figure E

    6. Select the Text Box tool and draw a box on the first page. Double click on any outer edge of the box, which will open the Format Text Box menu; select the Size tab, set the height and width to 6 x 4 inches. Select the Text Box tab, set all the margins to .5 inches, and click OK. See figure E.

  • 6 of 17Figure F
    Credit: Illustrations by Emily Cooper

    Figure F

    7. Using the Select Objects tool, drag the box to the edge of the bottom-left corner of the page. Copy (Edit > Copy) the box and paste (Edit > Paste) a duplicate outside the first box, then drag the copy so that it abuts the first box on its right side. Select both boxes by holding down the Shift key and clicking on each one. Copy and paste the boxes on each of the following pages (thirty-six in total). See figure F.

  • 7 of 17Figure G
    Credit: Illustrations by Emily Cooper

    Figure G

    8. The pages of your book will need to be printed double sided, which means the boxes on the even-numbered pages need to appear on the side of the page opposite the ones on the odd-numbered pages. On the even-numbered pages only, select both boxes by holding down the Shift key and clicking on each one. Drag them to the bottom-right corner of the page (fig. G). To set up your pages in the correct number of signatures—the configuration in which your book must be formatted and printed in order for the pages to be consecutive—insert your text in the order shown by placing the cursor in each box.

  • 8 of 17Figure H
    Credit: Illustrations by Emily Cooper

    Figure H

    9. Remove the lines around the boxes by holding down Shift and clicking on all the boxes; double click on the outer edge of one of them, which brings up the Format Text Box menu; under the Colors and Lines tab, select Line > Color > No line (fig. H).

  • 9 of 17Figure I
    Credit: Illustrations by Emily Cooper

    Figure I

    10. Printing the pages in the correct order and orientation is tricky and takes patience. First print all the even-numbered pages. Then print the odd-numbered pages on the backsides of the even numbered pages (this is where the page numbers in the headers come in handy). Do this in batches of three—if you make a mistake, it’s less daunting to correct three pages than all thirty-six. Check that your pages will feed through the printer in the correct order and in the correct orientation (page 1 should print on the back of page 2, page 3 on the back of page 4, and so on). After you have them printed correctly, trim off the excess margins so that you’re left with 8 x 6–inch sheets.

    11. Fold all the sheets in half vertically (fig. I).

  • 10 of 17Figure J
    Credit: Illustrations by Emily Cooper

    Figure J

    12. Assemble your signatures as shown in figure J (six sets of three pages) and put them under something heavy, such as a stack of books, to press them.

  • 11 of 17Figure K
    Credit: Illustrations by Emily Cooper

    Figure K

    13. Line up the fold of one of the signatures with your cover and lightly mark where the holes should be. Punch with an awl (fig. K). Use a page from this signature as a guide to punch the holes in the other signatures. Fold and press again.

  • 12 of 17Figure L
    Credit: Illustrations by Emily Cooper

    Figure L

    14. Stack your covers and signatures, making sure they’re in the proper orientation and page order. Take a piece of heavy thread (we used cooking twine) and wrap it around the stack lengthwise eight times (the number of signatures plus the covers) to determine the thread’s length. Cut it and thread a needle.

    15. Take your cover and the first signature, and begin sewing from inside the fold of the first signature through the bottom hole, leaving a tail of about two inches. Wrap around the cover and sew through the bottom hole (fig. L).

  • 13 of 17Figure M
    Credit: Illustrations by Emily Cooper

    Figure M

    16. Hold the tail inside the signature while you pull the length of the thread through. Thread the needle back through the bottom signature hole. Tie a double knot (fig. M).

  • 14 of 17Figure N
    Credit: Illustrations by Emily Cooper

    Figure N

    17. Sew through the second hole from inside the signature, as you did the first, and once again wrap around the cover. Sew through the second hole in the cover and then back through the second hole in the signature. Pull the thread through. Repeat this step until you get to the last hole.

    18. At the last hole, sew through from the inside of the signature and wrap around the cover and through the hole as before, but instead of sewing back into the signature, connect the second signature, by sewing through its top hole (fig. N). 

  • 15 of 17Figure O
    Credit: Illustrations by Emily Cooper

    Figure O

    19. Sew down to the second hole and out. Stitch between the first signature and the cover, pushing your needle under the loop of thread, which makes a kettle stitch. Sew back into the hole in the second signature (fig. O). Repeat this step until you get to the last hole.

    20. At the last hole, sew outward from the inside of your signature and make a kettle stitch, but do not sew back into the signature. Instead, connect the third signature by sewing into the bottom hole. Sew up to and out through the next hole and then make a kettle stitch between the previous two signatures. Sew all but the last signature this way. A couple of tips: Don’t split the thread by sewing through the middle of a previous stitch, and try to keep the tension even.

  • 16 of 17Figure P
    Credit: Illustrations by Emily Cooper

    Figure P

    21. Next you’re going to sew the remaining signature and the cover at the same time. Wrap the thread around the signature and the cover and bring the needle through the first hole in the cover. Then push the needle through the hole in the signature (fig. P).

  • 17 of 17Figures Q, R, and S
    Credit: Illustrations by Emily Cooper

    Figures Q, R, and S

    22. Sew outward through the next hole, kettle stitch between the previous two signatures (fig. Q), wrap around the cover and through the cover hole (fig. R), before sewing back into the hole in the signature. Repeat this step for the remaining holes. When you sew through the final hole, tie off as shown in figure S, twice. Trim the stray threads.

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DIY: How to Make a Pocket-Size Book

Posted 10.20.10

pocket-size.jpg

As a companion to Indie Innovators, a special section on groundbreaking presses and magazines, we demonstrate how to make a pocket-size book. View the accompanying slideshow for information on formatting your book in Microsoft Word.

Watch Video

Celebrating the Chapbook: Postcard From New York City

by Jean Hartig

Postcard

Online Only, posted 4.29.09

chapbooks.jpg

This past weekend, as the sidewalks and the streets of midtown Manhattan once again began to fill with urban dwellers lingering in the first warmth of spring, some of New York City's writers and publishers found pause indoors, creating, investigating, and celebrating the little sibling of the poetry collection: the chapbook.

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